Grilled Steak with Chimichurri Sauce (low-FODMAP recipe)

Grilled Steak with Chimichurri Sauce (low-FODMAP recipe)

This chimichurri sauce is packed with fresh herbs, bright lime juice, olive oil and a few other flavor boosters. It perks up any low FODMAP meal, especially grilled steak!

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Chimichurri is a sauce from Argentina made with fresh herbs and typically served over grilled meat. Since the sauce is uncooked it’s not only a snap to make, but the perfect summer condiment.

Chimichurri should be renamed “magic sauce,” because it’s magically delicious on just about anything. I’ve used it on:

Grilled steak, pork chops, and chicken breasts
Grilled fish and shrimp
Sandwiches
Eggs
Rice bowls
Tacos

If you’ve been to an Argentinian steak house, you’ve likely had chimichurri. The classic recipe includes a good amount of raw garlic, which I never liked (before the FODMAP Diet, I would actually cook the garlic before adding it to the chimichurri).

Luckily, the sauce is just as good sans garlic. In my opinion, it’s better. If you love garlic flavor, substitute garlic infused oil for 1 to 2 tablespoons of the olive oil. 

You’ll also find my recipe for roasted potatoes below, which is a typical side for an Argentinian grilled meal. The potatoes couldn’t be simpler, but I like to think I’ve perfected the method over the years to make the perfect roasted spuds. :-)

Looking for more low-FODMAP grilling recipes? Check out Lemon-Caper Fish and Veggies Grilled in Foil Packets and Caprese Salad with Grilled Eggplant!

Grilled Steak with Chimichurri Sauce

If you prefer sirloin or another cut of steak, go for it! The recipe calls for bone-in NY strip because that’s what I used, but boneless is great too. The sauce is also delicious on grilled pork, chicken, and fish. To use as a marinade, add extra olive oil and/or lime juice to thin. 

Serves 4 - Makes about ¾ cup, double recipe if needed (1 serving = 3 tbsp)

INGREDIENTS

1 cup (packed) parsley (leaves and thin stems)
1/4 to 1/3 cup mint leaves (about 4 sprigs)
1 tbsp red wine vinegar, plus additional if needed
1 lime, juiced
¼ cup extra-virgin olive oil, plus additional if needed
2 tsp Dijon mustard
1 tsp granulated sugar (or your sugar of choice)
1/2 tsp red chile flakes, or to taste (optional)
Sea salt to taste (1/4 to 1/2 tsp)
Freshly ground black pepper to taste
2 lbs bone-in New York strip (see note above)

INSTRUCTIONS

1. Add parsley and mint to a food processor and blitz until finely chopped, scraping down bowl as needed. Add vinegar and lime juice. With processor running, slowly pour olive oil through the feed tube. 

2. Add mustard, sugar and chile flakes if using. Season with salt and pepper. Pulse until blended. Consistency should be thick but pourable. Add additional oil or red wine vinegar to thin, depending on whether you like more or less acidity. Check seasoning. Can be used as a marinade, or served over grilled meat or fish. May be stored in the refrigerator up to 2 days. Serve at room temp.

3. Prepare a charcoal or gas grill (high for gas) and brush grate with oil. Season steaks with salt and pepper. Grill steaks over direct heat, turning once or twice, until done to your liking, 10 to 12 minutes for medium rare (130F to 135F). Rest at least 5 minutes. Slice and serve family style drizzled with chimichurri sauce.

Roasted Potatoes

Serves 4

Cooking spray
2 lbs yellow potatoes, cut into 1-inch chunks
1 to 2 tbsp olive oil
Salt and freshly ground black pepper to taste

1. Preheat oven to 400F. Line a large, rimmed baking sheet with foil (optional, to minimize clean up) and coat with cooking spray. Add potatoes and drizzle with oil. Season with salt and pepper and toss to coat.

2. Roast until potatoes are golden brown and very tender with pierced with a fork, tossing 2 times during cooking, 35 to 45 minutes. 

>>> If you want personalized help AND group support to do the FODMAP Diet Elimination Phase, I'd love to have you in my group program, Flat Belly Kitchen (beating the bloat = flat belly bliss). 

Click to get on the VIP list for the opportunity to register before it opens to the public since spots are limited!

VIP Registration begins August 14, 2017!

Caprese Salad with Grilled Eggplant (low-FODMAP recipe)

Caprese Salad with Grilled Eggplant (low-FODMAP recipe)

Grilling is the perfect cooking method for low fodmap recipes because it adds a ton of flavor. I took a classic Italian tomato and mozzarella salad and added slices of eggplant with a char straight from the grill. It's simple, fast, and delicious.

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During summer, I want easy recipes using the fresh produce that isn’t around come January in Chicago. I also want to grill as much as possible.

If you agree, you’ll love this recipe! “Easy” is really an understatement. Make this dish once and you’ll have it memorized forever. :-)

It’s a caprese salad, the classic Italian salad with colors meant to resemble the Italian flag, with the tasty addition of grilled eggplant. The eggplant makes this a more substantial side or appetizer, or even a light meatless meal.

When you have IBS, large servings of vegetables can be hard to digest, but caprese gives you that salad experience without a big bowl of lettuce and raw veggies. If you’re sensitive to vegetables, start with a small serving and see how you feel!

Looking for more low-FODMAP grilling recipes? Check out Lemon-Caper Fish and Veggies Grilled in Foil Packets or the Grilled Steak with Chimichurri Sauce!

Caprese Salad with Grilled Eggplant

This salad works best with flavorful tomatoes in season - If you grow them or have access to a farmer’s market, that’s the way to go! I used heirlooms, but common varieties are great too. Pair with sourdough bread or another grain for a light meatless meal. You could also add prosciutto or chicken to the salad for extra protein.

Serves 4

INGREDIENTS

1 medium eggplant, sliced in rounds about ¼-inch thick
Cooking spray or oil
Salt and freshly ground black pepper to taste
6 ounces fresh mozzarella, sliced thin
2 medium (7 to 8 ounces each) tomatoes (see note above), cut into wedges
Sea salt to taste
4 tsp extra virgin olive oil
4 tsp balsamic vinegar
Chopped fresh basil

INSTRUCTIONS

1. Prepare a charcoal or gas grill (medium-high for gas). Coat both sides of eggplant rounds with cooking spray (or brush with oil) and season with salt and pepper. Grill until very tender, 16 to 20 minutes, turning 3 to 4 times during cooking.

2. Arrange 3 eggplant slices (you may have some leftover) on each of four plates. Top evenly with mozzarella and tomatoes. Drizzle each plate with 1 tsp each extra-virgin olive oil and balsamic vinegar. Season tomatoes with sea salt. Garnish with basil and serve.

Tip: Want to make sure your fresh mozzarella is low lactose? Look at the “Sugars” line on the Nutrition Facts label. Lactose shows up as sugar in dairy products, so if it says “0 g” you know it’s low-FODMAP. This works for any cheese, as long as there are no added sugars in the ingredient list (honey, for example), which there shouldn’t be unless it’s a flavored cheese product.

>>> Need to make food shopping on the FODMAP Diet a little easier? I created a free shopping list of everyday food you can find at most supermarkets (plus links to some of my favorite low-FODMAP recipes!). Click to grab it!

Lemon-Caper Fish and Veggies Grilled in Foil Packets (Low-FODMAP Recipe)

Lemon-Caper Fish and Veggies Grilled in Foil Packets (Low-FODMAP Recipe)

This simple foil packet method is the easiest way to cook delicate fish and veggies on the grill. This low FODMAP recipe is healthy, fast and a great choice when you're eating for IBS.

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Need a simple, healthy grilling recipe that happens to be low-FODMAP? If you've ever tried to cook delicate white fish on the grill, there's a good chance you've ended up with a hot mess. I definitely have!

This simple foil packet method not only solves that problem, but it also gives you super-moist fish and flavorful veggies. It's a full meal in a packet!

The lemon and caper topping creates a delicious broth that doubles as a sauce...next time I'll likely transfer the entire contents of the packets into shallow bowls so I can catch every drop.

For the veggies I chose zucchini and red bell pepper, but you can change it up! Other great options are shredded carrots, kale, Swiss chard or green beans. You could also swap the lemon-caper topping for your favorite herbs and spices. It's the cooking method that's the star in this dish.

>>> Need to make food shopping on the FODMAP Diet a little easier? I created a free shopping list of everyday food you can find at most supermarkets (plus links to some of my favorite low-FODMAP recipes!). Click to grab it!

 

Looking for more low-FODMAP grilling recipes? Check out Caprese Salad with Grilled Eggplant or the Grilled Steak with Chimichurri Sauce!

Lemon-Caper Fish and Veggies Grilled in Foil Packs

Serves 2 (double recipe if needed)

This recipe works with especially well with delicate fish fillets that can be difficult to cook directly on the grill rack. I used whitefish fillets, but cod, tilapia, trout, or snapper would all work well - skin on or off.

INGREDIENTS

Cooking spray
1 medium zucchini, sliced thin
½ red bell pepper, sliced thin
Salt and freshly ground black pepper to taste
2 6-ounce fish fillets (see note above)
1 tsp olive oil
1 tbsp capers, chopped
1 lemon, sliced thin and seeds removed
Chopped parsley, basil, tarragon or cilantro for serving

INSTRUCTIONS

1. Prepare a charcoal or gas grill (medium-high for gas). Tear off two pieces of foil, 20-22 inches long each. If fish fillets are long and narrow, cut in half crosswise.

2. Place half the zucchini and bell pepper in the center of each piece of foil. Season with salt and pepper. Place fish on top of veggies. If you cut fillets into two pieces, place side by side. Drizzle with olive oil and season with salt and pepper. Top with capers and lemon slices.

3. Fold long sides of foil together and fold over to seal. Fold over each short end several times to seal tightly.

4. Place foil packets on grill and cook until fish is opaque in thickest part, 9 to 13 minutes. Thin, skinless fish will cook faster than thicker pieces or pieces with skin. Since the steam inside the packets is mainly responsible for cooking the fish, it’s difficult to dry out your fish with this method. The whitefish I used took 11 minutes. Place packets on plates or in shallow bowls and rest unopened for 5-10 minutes. Open carefully (steam will be hot), sprinkle with fresh herbs, and serve.
 

When is it time to reintroduce FODMAPs? (3 simple ways to know!)

When is it time to reintroduce FODMAPs? (3 simple ways to know!)

3 Simple ways to know it's time to reintroduce FODMAPs into your diet. If you have IBS, you may have gotten good at eliminating FODMAPs, but most people can bring many foods back to their diets and still feel great. Click through to find out when it's time to test your fodmap tolerance.

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When you start the FODMAP Diet, the goal is to hit the reset button on your body by eliminating as many high-FODMAP foods as possible.

But how do you know when it’s time move out of that restrictive phase and bring FODMAPs back into your diet? 

It’s not about a certain period of time, and it’s definitely not about being 100% symptom-free.

Instead there are 3 specific factors that let you know when to test your FODMAP tolerance so you can eventually enjoy a whole lot more variety in your diet.

To go in depth on this topic, watch this episode of Calm Belly TV. I cover the 3 factors in about the first 10 minutes, but if you’re not pressed for time there are some great Q&As from the live viewers!

You can also read the key points from the video below!

When is it time to reintroduce FODMAPs?

#1 You've seen consistent improvement in your IBS symptoms

  • You don’t have experience 100% improvement in symptoms
  • 75% improvement is awesome, 50% is still great
  • At 50-75% improvement you feel well enough to easily recognize reactions to high-FODMAP foods when you test them
  • If you do the elimination phase for 6 to 8 weeks, feeling that level of symptom relief for about a 4-week period qualifies as consistent

#2 You've identified and learned to manage other factors that affect digestion 

  • Other factors include stress in all its forms, hormonal fluctuations, exercise level, the overall volume of food you eat, the timing of meals, or how fast you eat
  • Your goal during the FODMAP testing phase is to keep your IBS symptoms as well-controlled as possible, so mastering those other factors is an important part of the elimination phase
  • Becoming more aware of your body and what it needs (NOT a common skill!) is one of the great side effects of the elimination phase

#3 You have a black belt in taking FODMAPs out of your diet

In other words, you’re really good at doing the elimination phase, and you know what your body feels like when you have maximum symptom control.

This is important so you can easily recognize reactions when you test high-FODMAP foods >>> You need to know which ones are truly triggering your symptoms AND which ones are not.

Here’s what a black belt in FODMAP looks like:

  • You know you’re not missing any hidden FODMAPs in your meals 
  • You understand how portion sizes impact FODMAP load
  • You know where sneaky FODMAPs can hide in restaurant meals
  • You’re great at checking ingredients lists
  • You’re super-comfortable using the Monash app
  • You’ve got plenty of tasty go-to meals and snacks

>>> All of the above means you’ll be able to easily test your FODMAP tolerance for those high-FODMAP foods without the stress of what to eat the rest of the time. It’s also a helpful skill because you can fall back on it during stressful times or health challenges that might come up in the future.

If you can check off the 3 items above, it’s time to move onto the reintroduction phase and test your personal tolerance to the various types of FODMAPs.

Key Takeaway

Most people with IBS can add certain high-FODMAP foods and categories back to their diets and still feel great. But the only way to know which FODMAPs are your friends is to test!

If you want personalized help and 1-1 support in the FODMAP testing process, my Find Your IBS Triggers program is the practical way to test FODMAPs and create your unique lifetime eating style that keeps your belly calm.

Learn more here!
 

Your 4-Step Plan for Life After the FODMAP Diet

You've learned your IBS triggers, but what should you actually eat for the rest of your life? Click through to get the simple 4-step plan to design a lifetime eating style that keeps your belly calm and you feeling your healthiest ever.

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Doing all the phases of the FODMAP Diet usually looks something like this:

  • You learn about the FODMAP Diet (the short-term learning diet that helps you find your unique IBS triggers and control your symptoms) and start changing the way you eat
  • You eventually get the hang of it, and your IBS symptoms improve
  • You test high-FODMAP categories to find your personal tolerance levels
  • Along the way, you learn a ton of valuable information about all the things that affect your digestion (both food and non-food factors)
  • You’re more empowered when it comes to IBS than you’ve ever been.

This is awesome. But where do you go from here?

How do you know you’ve been successful? When are you actually finished?

The end goal of the FODMAP Diet is rarely explained. If it’s not supposed to be a lifetime diet, what should you be eating for the rest of your life?

Short answer: You should bring as many high-FODMAP foods back into your diet as you can while keeping your belly happy.

This is “your unique lifetime eating style.” It’s unique to your FODMAP tolerance levels (based on testing those various FODMAP categories) AND what you enjoy eating. For example:

  • You may want to move toward a plant-based diet
  • You might want your diet to fuel you for a fitness goal, like running a marathon
  • You might want to get back to the family recipes and comfort foods you love, but modified to keep your belly happy

Today, I want to give you a simple framework to go from, “What’s next after to FODMAP,” to a lifetime eating style you love.

Your 4-Step Plan for Life After FODMAP

Step 1: Figure out our tolerance for all the high-FODMAP foods you’ve been missing    

Testing each FODMAP category through the reintroduction process helps you determine your tolerance level for ALL the foods in that category, but how much should you eat?

Go through the Monash app. List out the high-FODMAP foods you can bring back into your diet and an estimated serving size based on your tolerance for that food’s category.

If you had a moderate tolerance for wheat and want to eat rye bread, start with one slice. If you have no issues, you might try two slices next time. 

Do this with all the foods you love. You can take a casual approach, or add one new thing every other day. Soon, you’ll know the portion sizes that work, and you can start enjoying them regularly.

Step 2: Experiment with frequency

Now that you’ve brought back the foods that don’t trigger your IBS, it’s useful to understand how many high-FODMAP foods you can tolerate in a day or in single meal.

Do some experiments. If you have a moderate tolerance for wheat, can you eat toast at breakfast, half a sandwich at lunch, and a serving of pasta for dinner?

Step 3: Revisit other factors that impact digestion

At this point you’re regularly enjoying high-FODMAP foods in the amounts you can tolerate. If your IBS symptoms are fully in check, fabulous! If you have symptoms more than you’d like and can’t link them to a specific food, then take a look at other things that impact digestion.

For example, have you started eating larger portions? Are you skipping meals or eating late at night? Have you stopped exercising or moving as much throughout the day? Have you started a new medication or supplement that might be causing side effects?

Step 4: Take on a new health goal 

The FODMAP Diet tends to be all encompassing. Giving it your focus likely helped you succeed, but that probably forced you to put everything else on the back burner. 

The momentum you’ve built by taking control of IBS puts you in the perfect position to tackle a health goal you’ve put on hold for months, maybe even years.

Do you want to finally get to your happy weight? Kick sugar? Go vegetarian? Keep refining your lifetime eating style? Now's the time to go for it!

If you're ready to create your lifetime eating style or tackle a NEW health goal ASAP, let me save you time by creating a step-by-step plan that supports you and continues the work you've done with FODMAP. Click to learn more.

If life after FODMAP feels really far off, I can help you take control of IBS faster than doing endless google searches and sorting through conflicting information online. Learn more here.