Cranberry Sauce with Clementines and Ginger (Low-FODMAP recipe)

Cranberry Sauce with Clementines and Ginger (Low-FODMAP recipe)

Fresh cranberries are low fodmap, and here they're combined with pumpkin pie spice, clementines, and ginger to make a delicious side dish for your Thanksgiving meal! #fodmap #IBS

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When it comes to Thanksgiving (or any holiday really), we all have our “must-have” dishes. The two or three foods that, if they aren’t on the table come turkey day, we feel let down.

For me one of those must-have dishes is cranberry sauce. I LOVED the canned stuff when I was a kid. You know, the one that came out like a jelly log? I was probably in my 20s the first time I had it made from fresh cranberries.

But once I did taste the real thing, there was no going back! I've made creative versions of it with pears and cardamom or jalapenos and curry powder in years past. Nothing wrong with plain, but I love to jazz it up.

I’m thrilled that cranberries are low-FODMAP (They haven’t been officially tested, but Monash University has stated that 4.6 oz of fresh cranberries is low FODMAP.). That meant I could create yet another version this year. I kept it simple this time around - just cranberries, sectioned clementines, ginger and pumpkin spice.

The traditional Thanksgiving meal is a pretty great one for FODMAPers. You’ve got your cranberry sauce, turkey, mashed potatoes, stuffing (you will NOT feel let down by the cornbread stuffing recipe I shared last week!)...and probably a few others I'm forgetting.

I’d love to hear your Thanksgiving must-haves! Leave a comment and let me know.

Cranberry Sauce with Clementines and Ginger (Low-FODMAP recipe)

I use a little less sugar in my cranberry sauce than most recipes. Feel free to increase it by 1/4 to ⅓ cup if you like yours on the sweeter side. You can also adjust the spice level up or down to suit your tastes. If you don’t have fresh ginger, substitute ½ tsp of ground ginger. 

Makes 8 to 10 low-FODMAP servings

INGREDIENTS

12 oz cranberries
2 clementines, sections separated and halved crosswise
2/3 cup granulated sugar
⅓ cup water
1 tbsp chopped fresh ginger
½ tsp pumpkin pie spice
¼ tsp salt

INSTRUCTIONS

Combine all ingredients in a large saucepan and bring to a simmer on medium-high heat, stirring often. Reduce heat to medium and simmer until cranberries burst and liquid thickens, 15 to 18 minutes, stirring often to prevent sticking. Cool and refrigerate in an airtight container. May be made up to 3 days ahead.Serve chilled or at room temp.

Cornbread Stuffing (Low-FODMAP recipe)

Cornbread Stuffing (Low-FODMAP recipe)

This low FODMAP cornbread stuffing is going to be the hit of your Thanksgiving dinner. You do NOT need to sacrifice this holiday if you're following the low fodmap diet. With an easy gluten free cornbread you can make ahead of time, this stuffing can baked in your turkey or separately. #fodmap #IBS

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I feel bad. Want to know why…

Apparently I’ve kept this cornbread stuffing recipe to myself for the past two years. I know, it’s really not very charitable. But now it’s finally time to get this recipe to you and you’re going to love it.

This stuffing is packed with those Thanksgiving flavors you’re craving (It’ll make your house smell great.). It’s amazing as a turkey stuffing, but it’s also delicious baked on it’s own - I provided instructions for both.

And yes, it’s totally low-FODMAP, but make the whole batch because EVERYONE will love this.

My excuse for not sharing sooner is that I’ve been tweaking the cornbread recipe. It’s a super-simple, southern-style cornbread (in other words, not packed with sugar or other embellishments).

Since it’s made with only cornmeal and technically gluten-free, it’s a tiny bit crumbly. But that is perfect for stuffing.

I’ve tested out many many gluten-free cornbread recipes - from gummy and unpleasant to totally edible - before landing on this version. It turned out the simplest ingredients produced the best result.                   

There are extensive notes for this recipe because it really is flexible! But it’s also simple and straightforward, especially if you bake the cornbread a day or two ahead. 

Once you try this, you won’t want to save it just for Thanksgiving...I definitely don’t.

Need a hand with FODMAP? Click to get your free FODMAP Diet Shopping List!

Cornbread Stuffing (Low-FODMAP recipe)

Makes 8 servings

NOTES

  • This stuffing is flexible: Swap the pork for smoked oysters (trust me!), roasted chestnuts, or any kind of sausage you tolerate. 
  • Giving the ground pork plenty of seasoning makes it taste like sausage. You can swap in any low-FODMAP spices you like - If you're not a fan of smoked paprika, try regular sweet paprika. 
  • If celery (the amount per serving is well under the low-FODMAP limit) doesn’t work for you, go with or parsnips or zucchini, or extra carrots. 
  • The green part of a leek is low-FODMAP; remove the coarse outer layers. I typically use some of the light green part, but do whatever you're comfortable with. If your leeks are cut off at the top, or smaller in size, use two. You want about 1 cup of chopped leek.
  • For chicken broth: In the US, Progresso Regular Chicken Broth and the Progresso Regular Chicken Broth Reduced Sodium do not contain onion or garlic; if Progresso is unavailable search “low fodmap chicken broth” on amazon to find a variety of products. Internationally, Massel’s makes garlic/onion-free bouillion. Or DIY a simple chicken (or turkey) broth
  • This is absolutely fantastic baked in your Thanksgiving turkey (and if you do this, you’ll have about ½ the stuffing to bake and serve on the side), but there are instructions for baking the whole batch separately. 
  • The cornbread may be prepared up to 2 days ahead, and the stuffing may be assembled up to 1 day ahead and kept covered in the refrigerator.

FOR CORNBREAD:

1 1/4 cups lactose-free milk (regular lactose-free milk is best for baking, but almond milk works too)
1 tbsp white vinegar
2 cups (270 grams) stone ground yellow cornmeal
1 tbsp sugar
3/4 tsp baking soda
3/4 tsp salt
1 large or extra large egg
2 tbsp unsalted butter

1. Preheat oven to 400F and heat a 9-inch cast iron skillet in the oven for 10 minutes (If you don’t have a skillet, use a 9-inch cake pan; wait to place it in the oven until Step 3). In a small bowl, stir together the milk and vinegar; set aside for 5 minutes.

2. In a large bowl, whisk together the cornmeal, sugar, baking soda and salt. In a separate bowl whisk the egg. Add the milk mixture to the egg and whisk until combined. Add the wet ingredients to the dry ingredients and stir until moistened.

3. Take the hot skillet out of the oven (careful, handle is HOT) and add the butter. Return to the oven until butter melts, 1 to 2 minutes at most. Remove the skillet from the oven, swirl the skillet to coat the sides with butter, and pour the excess butter into the batter and whisk until combined (batter will be liquidy).

4. Pour the batter into the hot skillet and return to the oven. Bake 18 to 20 minutes, or until the top is golden brown and a toothpick comes out clean or with a few crumbs. Cool in skillet for 10 minutes, then invert onto a plate and invert again onto a wire rack. Cool completely. May be made up to 2 days ahead. Refrigerate in an airtight container.

FOR STUFFING:

Cooking spray
8 oz. ground pork
1 tsp ancho chile powder
½ tsp smoked paprika
Salt and freshly ground black pepper to taste
1 tbsp oil
1 ¼ cup diced carrots
3/4 cup chopped celery
1 large leek, green part only, chopped
½ tsp dried thyme
½ tsp dried tarragon
1 large or extra large egg
1 ½ to 2 ½ cups chicken broth, divided
1 tbsp butter, melted


INSTRUCTIONS

1. Preheat oven to 350F. Cut cornbread into ¾-inch cubes and spread on a large rimmed baking sheet (bread will be a little crumbly, but that's great for stuffing). Bake until lightly toasted, tossing the bread around once or twice, about 20 minutes. Cool on baking sheet. May be done several hours ahead. Store at room temp in an airtight container.

2. Mist a large skillet with cooking spray and heat to medium high. Add pork, chile powder, and paprika; season with salt and pepper. Cook until meat is no longer pink, crumbling with your spoon, about 5 minutes. Transfer to a small bowl, leaving any pork fat remaining in the skillet.

3. Heat oil in the same skillet, with heat still at medium high. Add carrot, celery, leek, thyme, and tarragon; season with salt and pepper. Cook, stirring frequently, until tender and lightly browned, 7 to 9 minutes.

4. Add toasted cornbread to a large bowl. Add veggie mixture and pork; stir gently to combine. In a small bowl, whisk the egg; add 1 ½ cups of broth and whisk to combine. Add egg mixture to cornbread mixture and stir gently. For stuffing baked in a turkey, you want it to be on the dry side, but add a bit more broth if needed.

5. Add 1/3 to 1/2 of the stuffing to the turkey cavity (don't over stuff; it will expand). Roast the turkey, making sure the stuffing reaches 165F. (If you're not stuffing a turkey, add 1 cup broth to the stuffing mixture bake in a 2-quart baking dish, following the directions in step 4.)

6. Add ½ to 1 cup of the remaining broth to the remaining stuffing so mixture is moist but not soggy. Mist a 1-quart (8x8-inch) baking dish with cooking spray and add stuffing. Drizzle melted butter over the top. Bake until lightly browned and heated through, 20-30 minutes at 350F (If you're baking something at the same time – like turkey – that requires a specific temp, you can bake the stuffing anywhere from 325F to 375F, adding or subtracting a couple minutes of baking time). Cool 5 minutes and serve.

What To Expect at Each Stage of the FODMAP Diet (and common pitfalls to avoid!)

What To Expect at Each Stage of the FODMAP Diet (and common pitfalls to avoid!)

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You wouldn't set out on a road trip without a map (or more likely, GPS on your phone).

That's because knowing what to expect and how to navigate along the way can save you from veering off track. 

Same's true for the FODMAP Diet. When you know the common challenges others have faced AND how they've overcome them, you won't get stuck or be tempted to quit.

That's what I shared in this recent edition of Calm Belly TV...

Watch the video, or if you prefer to read there's a detailed summary of the key points below.

I'd love to know what you think of this topic. Is there something I missed?

What To Expect at Each Stage of the FODMAP Diet (and common pitfalls to avoid)

Here's a detailed summary of what's covered in the video...

The Elimination Phase

Expect:

  • That it takes time - typically 2 to 3 weeks - for most people to get the hang of the FODMAP diet (understanding portion sizes; spotting sneaky FODMAPs, planning ahead)
  • To learn what non-FODMAP factors play a major role in your digestion

Common Pitfalls:

  • Giving up too soon
  • Expecting your IBS to go away completely
  • Staying in the elimination phase indefinitely

TIP: Move onto the reintroduction phase when you have consistent symptom improvement (50-80% improvement most of the time)

The Reintroduction phase

Expect:

  • To adapt the testing process to your life, not the other way around (You can take breaks and test at your own pace; this should NOT be a one-size-fits-all process)
  • Example: One member of my Free To Eat program had a stressful job and didn’t want to test during the week so she timed it to only test larger servings over the weekend
  • To quickly learn when to expect symptoms

Common Pitfalls:

  • Worrying about causing yourself major symptoms (strategic testing is the answer)
  • Expecting symptoms to happen right after eating a high-FODMAP food
  • Bringing back high-FODMAP foods before you finish testing (eat a low-FODMAP diet so you get the clearest results from the testing process)

AFTER the Reintroduction Phase

Expect:

  • To feel proud and excited for learning your IBS triggers
  • To continue doing experiments to discover your best lifetime eating style (For my program I created a workbook full of simple experiments you can do to learn how often you can eat different FODMAPs, how to best combine them, etc.)

Common Pitfalls:

  • Not adding well-tolerated high-FODMAP foods back to your diet
  • Forgetting that this is a long-term lifestyle change (it's okay if it happens gradually)

 

Ancho-Orange Roast Chicken and Spaghetti Squash (low FODMAP recipe)

Ancho-Orange Roast Chicken and Spaghetti Squash (low FODMAP recipe)

Sweet, smoky ancho chile powder and orange zest give this chicken a pop of flavor. It's low FODMAP and perfect with roasted spaghetti squash topped with goat cheese. The perfect spiced-up twist on your classic roast chicken! #fodmap #IBS

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Ancho chile powder is easily the most-used spice in my kitchen, so of course I had to include it in the Low-FODMAP Spices Series.

First let’s clear something up real quick: Ancho chile powder is made from dried and ground ancho chiles, nothing else. The same goes for chipotle chile powder or ground cayenne. 

On the other hand, when you see a spice labelled “chili powder” or chili seasoning, it’s usually a blend of many ingredients like cayenne, paprika, pepper, salt, AND ground onion and garlic powders. Since you’re aiming to avoid onion and garlic in the FODMAP elimination phase, chili powders like this are a no-go.

Instead, look for those pure ground chile powders like ancho. The big spice brands like McCormick sell it, so it’s easy to find in large supermarkets these days. If you want to buy it online (along with just about any spice), check out The Spice House.

Catch up on other recipes in the Low-FODMAP Spices Series:

Grilled Chicken with Curry-Lime Marinade

Maple-Soy Chicken Drumsticks with 5 Spice

Easy Coconut-Shrimp Curry with Chickpeas

What does ancho chile powder taste like and how do you use it?

Ancho chile powder is mild, so if you don’t like a lot of heat in your food this is the one for you. The flavor is slightly sweet and smoky. When you open a jar of fresh ancho chile powder, you’ll notice the scent of dried fruit.

You can use ancho chile powder in Mexican dishes - It’s great paired with cumin, paprika, or coriander. It’s also great as an all-purpose flavor booster for just about any protein.

But I especially like using it in unexpected ways, like in an Italian meat sauce. It won’t make your bolognese taste like Mexican; instead it adds an extra dimension of flavor with its sweet smokiness.

More Ways To Use Ancho Chile Powder:

  • Use it alone to season pork, chicken, salmon or shrimp
  • Make it the main ingredient in a rub for roasted or smoked pork (I like to include cumin, thyme, coriander, coffee, and brown sugar) 
  • Pair it with cumin to season ground meat for tacos or any Latin dish
  • Use it to add flavor and depth to Italian meat sauces, meatballs, or any tomato-based sauce
  • Use it to season roasted winter acorn squash - the sweetness of the squash is a great match for ancho chile
  • Sprinkle it on potatoes when you make baked french fries to add flavor and color
  • Pair it with paprika to season grilled chicken

Ancho-Orange Roast Chicken and Spaghetti Squash (low FODMAP)

While the chicken rests, you can use those pan juices! Transfer them to a fat separator or a bowl and remove as much fat as possible - you now have homemade broth. Use the juices as a sauce for the roast chicken or later in another dish. If you have time, allow the chicken to come to room temperature for 30 to 45 minutes before cooking - this reduces the roasting time. 

Serves 4 (spaghetti squash yields 38-42 oz. cooked)

INGREDIENTS

1 tbsp ancho chile powder
1 tsp dried thyme
1 navel orange, zested
5 to 6 lb chicken
Cooking spray or oil
Salt and freshly ground black pepper
2 ¼ to 2 ½ lb spaghetti squash
1 tbsp extra virgin olive oil
2 oz goat cheese, crumbled
Lime wedges for serving
Chopped fresh cilantro for garnish

INSTRUCTIONS

1. Preheat oven to 425F and arrange oven racks in upper and lower thirds of the oven. In a small bowl, combine ancho chile powder, thyme and the orange zest. Rinse chicken and remove giblets and any excess fat; pat dry with paper towel. Place chicken on a rack inside a large roasting pan. Coat with cooking spray or oil and season generously with salt and pepper, inside and out. 

2. Gently lift the skin covering the breasts near the cavity end of the chicken and push a generous amount of the ancho mixture under the skin, seasoning the breast meat. Rub remaining ancho mixture all over the top and sides of the chicken. Place half the orange inside the cavity, and tuck the wing tips under the body of the chicken. Add a thin layer of water (about ¼-inch) to the roasting pan and place on the lower rack of the oven. 

3. Roast for 1 hour 30 minutes to 2 hours (see note). After about 1 hour, cover the top of the chicken loosely with large piece of foil to prevent over browning. Chicken is done when internal temp reaches 165F on an instant read thermometer, testing chicken in the center of the breast and thickest part of the thigh, not touching the bone. Rest 10 minutes.

4. As soon as you get the chicken in the oven, prep the spaghetti squash: Trim the stem end, then cut in half lengthwise. Line a large rimmed baking sheet with foil (optional, but minimizes cleanup) and mist with cooking spray or oil and place squash on baking sheet cut-side-down. Roast in upper third of the oven until flesh is very tender when pierced with a fork, 40 to 45 minutes. 

5. Transfer squash to a cutting board, cut-side-up to cool. When cool enough to handle, scoop out the layer of seeds and slimy bits of squash. Then with a fork, lightly scrape the squash out of the skin in spaghetti-like strands and transfer to a medium bowl. Add extra virgin olive oil, season with salt and pepper and stir gently to combine. Transfer to serving platter and sprinkle with goat cheese. Serve with chicken and lime wedges, and garnish the whole thing with fresh cilantro.

Easy Coconut-Shrimp Curry with Chickpeas (low FODMAP, dairy free)

Easy Coconut-Shrimp Curry with Chickpeas (low FODMAP, dairy free)

You don't 20 ingredients or 3 hours to make a DELICIOUS low fodmap curry with coconut milk, chickpeas, and potatoes. Vegetarian or vegan option is easy too! With cooking techniques and spices that maximize flavor, you will love this weeknight meal! #fodmap #IBS

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This low-FODMAP curry has a satisfying creamy texture thanks to coconut milk. But it’s also packed with flavor from a few carefully chosen spices. 

If you think high-FODMAP ingredients like garlic, onion, or store-bought broth are necessary for a tasty curry, you’re going to like this recipe.

This post is part of the Low-FODMAP Spices Series, and I chose to highlight coriander with an easy weeknight curry. 

Check out the other posts in the Low-FODMAP Spices Series:

Grilled Chicken with Curry-Lime Marinade

Maple-Soy Chicken Drumsticks with 5 Spice

What does coriander taste like and how do you use it?

You’ve likely tasted coriander, but you may not know it - It’s frequently paired and blended with other spices, but sometimes I like making it the star of the show.

It’s a common mate for cumin and chile powder in Mexican cooking. It also makes frequent appearances in Indian recipes, as well as their signature spice blends like garam masala and curry seasoning.

Coriander has a warm, earthy, slightly citrusy flavor with a sour edge in the background (It comes from the same plant as fresh cilantro leaves, but they taste completely different.). Some people taste lemon, but I get a hint of orange, and I love pairing coriander and orange zest. 

It’s fun to select your own curry spices rather than buying the standard yellow “curry powder,” because you can highlight your favorite flavors. And you don’t need to fuss with 10 different spices (exhausting!).

Along with the mellow, earthy coriander, I used cumin for smokiness and depth plus turmeric for that bright yellow color and tangy flavor. As with all spices, make sure they’re fresh so you get the full flavor. 

Here a few more ways you can use coriander:

  • Pair with thyme and orange zest as a rub for roast turkey, chicken or pork
  • Pair with cumin and ancho chile powder, and use Mexican dishes
  • Season vegetables for roasting - Try potatoes, acorn squash, spaghetti squash, carrots, eggplant, or rutabaga
  • Try it in creamy parsnip-potato or carrot soup
  • Spice up rice pilaf

The trio of spices in this curry is definitely a major flavor factor, but cooking technique also makes a HUGE difference.

Here’s how I built flavor during the cooking process:

  1. I sauteed the leek until lightly browned to bring out its sweetness, then added the jalapeno, ginger and some of the spices just until combined. I took this mixture OUT of the pan and added it back at the very end so the flavors stayed fresh and bold. 
  2. I seasoned at every stage of the cooking process.
  3. I sauteed the potatoes, carrots, tomatoes, and spices BEFORE adding any liquid so the spices would have a chance to toast and the vegetables would develop more flavor. The picture below is exactly what that looks like - YUM right?

You can use these techniques in all sorts of recipes!

Easy Coconut-Shrimp Curry with Chickpeas (low FODMAP, dairy free)

You can omit the shrimp and add an extra potato to make this dish vegan, or substitute chicken for the shrimp. To prep the leek, cut off the white part and discard the tough outer layers. Here’s the best leek washing technique. In a pinch, you can sub scallion tops for the leek, but cook them for 30 seconds at most. 

Serves 4

INGREDIENTS

2 tbsp oil or ghee, divided
1 leek top (green part only), chopped (see note)
Salt and freshly ground black pepper to taste
1 jalapeno, chopped (optional, see note)
1-inch piece fresh ginger, peeled and finely chopped
1 tbsp ground coriander, divided
2 tsp ground cumin, divided
1 medium Russet potato (about 8 oz), peeled and cut into 1-inch chunks (about 2 cups)
2 medium carrots, sliced (about 1 cup)
1 large tomato (about 8 oz), chopped (about 1 cup)
1 1/2 tsp turmeric
1 1/2 cups water
1 (13.5 oz) can coconut milk, regular or light
1 slightly heaping cup canned and rinsed chickpeas (168 g)
3/4 pound medium shrimp
1/2 lime
Chopped fresh cilantro for serving

INSTRUCTIONS

1. Heat 1 tbsp of the oil in a large sauce pan or Dutch oven on medium heat. Add leek, season with salt and pepper and cook, stirring frequently, until lightly browned, about 5 minutes. Add jalapeno, ginger, and ½ tsp EACH of the coriander and cumin. Cook until jalapeno softens, 1 to 2 minutes. Transfer to a small bowl and set aside.

2. Add remaining oil to pan and raise heat to medium high. Add potato and carrots, season with salt and pepper and cook, stirring frequently, until carrots softens slightly, about 5 minutes. Add tomato, remaining coriander, remaining cumin, and turmeric; season with salt and pepper. Cook, stirring frequently, until tomato breaks down and becomes saucy, 5 to 6 minutes.

3. Add water. Raise heat to high and bring to a boil. Add coconut milk and bring to a boil. Add chickpeas. Reduce heat to medium/medium-high and cook, uncovered, at a steady simmer until potatoes and carrots are tender, about 10 minutes. 

4. Add shrimp and simmer, stirring occasionally, until opaque in the thickest part, 2 to 3 minutes. Stir in reserved leek mixture and remove from heat. Stir in juice of half a lime. Taste for seasoning and add salt and pepper if desired. Serve over Perfect Basmati Rice (recipe below) and garnish with cilantro.

Perfect Basmati Rice

You can use brown basmati if you prefer; follow cooking instructions on the package.

Serves 4 to 6

1 tbsp unsalted butter
1 cup white basmati rice
2 cups water
½ tsp salt

In a medium saucepan, melt butter on medium heat. Add rice and cook, stirring frequently, until grains become partially opaque, about 2 minutes. Add water and salt. Raise heat to high and bring to a boil. Reduce heat to lowest setting, cover, and cook for 17 minutes. With cover still in place, rest 10 minutes. Fluff with a fork and serve.