low-FODMAP

Cornbread Stuffing (Low-FODMAP, gluten free)

Cornbread Stuffing (Low-FODMAP recipe)

This low FODMAP cornbread stuffing is going to be the hit of your Thanksgiving dinner. You do NOT need to sacrifice this holiday if you're following the low fodmap diet. With an easy gluten free cornbread you can make ahead of time, this stuffing can baked in your turkey or separately. #fodmap #IBS

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I feel bad. Want to know why…

Apparently I’ve kept this cornbread stuffing recipe to myself for the past two years. I know, it’s really not very charitable. But now it’s finally time to get this recipe to you and you’re going to love it.

This stuffing is packed with those Thanksgiving flavors you’re craving (It’ll make your house smell great.). It’s amazing as a turkey stuffing, but it’s also delicious baked on it’s own - I provided instructions for both.

And yes, it’s totally low-FODMAP & gluten free, but make the whole batch because EVERYONE will love this.

My excuse for not sharing sooner is that I’ve been tweaking the cornbread recipe. It’s a super-simple, southern-style cornbread (in other words, not packed with sugar or other embellishments).

Since it’s made with only cornmeal and technically gluten-free, it’s a tiny bit crumbly. But that is perfect for stuffing.

I’ve tested out many many gluten-free cornbread recipes - from gummy and unpleasant to totally edible - before landing on this version. It turned out the simplest ingredients produced the best result.                   

There are extensive notes for this recipe because it really is flexible! But it’s also simple and straightforward, especially if you bake the cornbread a day or two ahead. 

Once you try this, you won’t want to save it just for Thanksgiving...I definitely don’t.

Need a hand with FODMAP? Click to get your free FODMAP Diet Shopping List!

Cornbread Stuffing (Low-FODMAP recipe)

Makes 8 servings

NOTES

  • This stuffing is flexible: Swap the pork for smoked oysters (trust me!), roasted chestnuts, or any kind of sausage you tolerate.

  • Giving the ground pork plenty of seasoning makes it taste like sausage. You can swap in any low-FODMAP spices you like - If you're not a fan of smoked paprika, try regular sweet paprika.

  • If celery (the amount per serving is well under the low-FODMAP limit) doesn’t work for you, go with or parsnips or zucchini, or extra carrots.

  • The green part of a leek is low-FODMAP; remove the coarse outer layers. I typically use some of the light green part, but do whatever you're comfortable with. If your leeks are cut off at the top, or smaller in size, use two. You want about 1 cup of chopped leek.

  • For chicken broth: In the US, Progresso Regular Chicken Broth and the Progresso Regular Chicken Broth Reduced Sodium do not contain onion or garlic; if Progresso is unavailable search “low fodmap chicken broth” on amazon to find a variety of products. Internationally, Massel’s makes garlic/onion-free bouillion. Or DIY a simple chicken (or turkey) broth

  • This is absolutely fantastic baked in your Thanksgiving turkey (and if you do this, you’ll have about ½ the stuffing to bake and serve on the side), but there are instructions for baking the whole batch separately.

  • The cornbread may be prepared up to 2 days ahead, and the stuffing may be assembled up to 1 day ahead and kept covered in the refrigerator.

FOR CORNBREAD:

1 1/4 cups lactose-free milk (regular lactose-free milk is best for baking, but almond milk works too)
1 tbsp white vinegar
2 cups (270 grams) stone ground yellow cornmeal
1 tbsp sugar
3/4 tsp baking soda
3/4 tsp salt
1 large or extra large egg
2 tbsp unsalted butter

1. Preheat oven to 400F and heat a 9-inch cast iron skillet in the oven for 10 minutes (If you don’t have a skillet, use a 9-inch cake pan; wait to place it in the oven until Step 3). In a small bowl, stir together the milk and vinegar; set aside for 5 minutes.

2. In a large bowl, whisk together the cornmeal, sugar, baking soda and salt. In a separate bowl whisk the egg. Add the milk mixture to the egg and whisk until combined. Add the wet ingredients to the dry ingredients and stir until moistened.

3. Take the hot skillet out of the oven (careful, handle is HOT) and add the butter. Return to the oven until butter melts, 1 to 2 minutes at most. Remove the skillet from the oven, swirl the skillet to coat the sides with butter, and pour the excess butter into the batter and whisk until combined (batter will be liquidy).

4. Pour the batter into the hot skillet and return to the oven. Bake 18 to 20 minutes, or until the top is golden brown and a toothpick comes out clean or with a few crumbs. Cool in skillet for 10 minutes, then invert onto a plate and invert again onto a wire rack. Cool completely. May be made up to 2 days ahead. Refrigerate in an airtight container.

FOR STUFFING:

Cooking spray
8 oz. ground pork
1 tsp ancho chile powder
½ tsp smoked paprika
Salt and freshly ground black pepper to taste
1 tbsp oil
1 ¼ cup diced carrots
3/4 cup chopped celery
1 large leek, green part only, chopped
½ tsp dried thyme
½ tsp dried tarragon
1 large or extra large egg
1 ½ to 2 ½ cups chicken broth, divided
1 tbsp butter, melted


INSTRUCTIONS

1. Preheat oven to 350F. Cut cornbread into ¾-inch cubes and spread on a large rimmed baking sheet (bread will be a little crumbly, but that's great for stuffing). Bake until lightly toasted, tossing the bread around once or twice, about 20 minutes. Cool on baking sheet. May be done several hours ahead. Store at room temp in an airtight container.

2. Mist a large skillet with cooking spray and heat to medium high. Add pork, chile powder, and paprika; season with salt and pepper. Cook until meat is no longer pink, crumbling with your spoon, about 5 minutes. Transfer to a small bowl, leaving any pork fat remaining in the skillet.

3. Heat oil in the same skillet, with heat still at medium high. Add carrot, celery, leek, thyme, and tarragon; season with salt and pepper. Cook, stirring frequently, until tender and lightly browned, 7 to 9 minutes.

4. Add toasted cornbread to a large bowl. Add veggie mixture and pork; stir gently to combine. In a small bowl, whisk the egg; add 1 ½ cups of broth and whisk to combine. Add egg mixture to cornbread mixture and stir gently. For stuffing baked in a turkey, you want it to be on the dry side, but add a bit more broth if needed.

5. Add 1/3 to 1/2 of the stuffing to the turkey cavity (don't over stuff; it will expand). Roast the turkey, making sure the stuffing reaches 165F. (If you're not stuffing a turkey, add 1 cup broth to the stuffing mixture bake in a 2-quart baking dish, following the directions in step 4.)

6. Add ½ to 1 cup of the remaining broth to the remaining stuffing so mixture is moist but not soggy. Mist a 1-quart (8x8-inch) baking dish with cooking spray and add stuffing. Drizzle melted butter over the top. Bake until lightly browned and heated through, 20-30 minutes at 350F (If you're baking something at the same time – like turkey – that requires a specific temp, you can bake the stuffing anywhere from 325F to 375F, adding or subtracting a couple minutes of baking time). Cool 5 minutes and serve.

Lemon-Caper Fish and Veggies Grilled in Foil Packets (Low-FODMAP Recipe)

Lemon-Caper Fish and Veggies Grilled in Foil Packets (Low-FODMAP Recipe)

This simple foil packet method is the easiest way to cook delicate fish and veggies on the grill. This low FODMAP recipe is healthy, fast and a great choice when you're eating for IBS.

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Need a simple, healthy grilling recipe that happens to be low-FODMAP? If you've ever tried to cook delicate white fish on the grill, there's a good chance you've ended up with a hot mess. I definitely have!

This simple foil packet method not only solves that problem, but it also gives you super-moist fish and flavorful veggies. It's a full meal in a packet!

The lemon and caper topping creates a delicious broth that doubles as a sauce...next time I'll likely transfer the entire contents of the packets into shallow bowls so I can catch every drop.

For the veggies I chose zucchini and red bell pepper, but you can change it up! Other great options are shredded carrots, kale, Swiss chard or green beans. You could also swap the lemon-caper topping for your favorite herbs and spices. It's the cooking method that's the star in this dish.

>>> Need to make food shopping on the FODMAP Diet a little easier? I created a free shopping list of everyday food you can find at most supermarkets (plus links to some of my favorite low-FODMAP recipes!). Click to grab it!

 

Looking for more low-FODMAP grilling recipes? Check out Caprese Salad with Grilled Eggplant or the Grilled Steak with Chimichurri Sauce!

Lemon-Caper Fish and Veggies Grilled in Foil Packs

Serves 2 (double recipe if needed)

This recipe works with especially well with delicate fish fillets that can be difficult to cook directly on the grill rack. I used whitefish fillets, but cod, tilapia, trout, or snapper would all work well - skin on or off.

INGREDIENTS

Cooking spray
1 medium zucchini, sliced thin
½ red bell pepper, sliced thin
Salt and freshly ground black pepper to taste
2 6-ounce fish fillets (see note above)
1 tsp olive oil
1 tbsp capers, chopped
1 lemon, sliced thin and seeds removed
Chopped parsley, basil, tarragon or cilantro for serving

INSTRUCTIONS

1. Prepare a charcoal or gas grill (medium-high for gas). Tear off two pieces of foil, 20-22 inches long each. If fish fillets are long and narrow, cut in half crosswise.

2. Place half the zucchini and bell pepper in the center of each piece of foil. Season with salt and pepper. Place fish on top of veggies. If you cut fillets into two pieces, place side by side. Drizzle with olive oil and season with salt and pepper. Top with capers and lemon slices.

3. Fold long sides of foil together and fold over to seal. Fold over each short end several times to seal tightly.

4. Place foil packets on grill and cook until fish is opaque in thickest part, 9 to 13 minutes. Thin, skinless fish will cook faster than thicker pieces or pieces with skin. Since the steam inside the packets is mainly responsible for cooking the fish, it’s difficult to dry out your fish with this method. The whitefish I used took 11 minutes. Place packets on plates or in shallow bowls and rest unopened for 5-10 minutes. Open carefully (steam will be hot), sprinkle with fresh herbs, and serve.
 

Curried Deviled Eggs with Chile-Lime Salt (FODMAP and gluten free)

Curried Deviled Eggs with Chile-Lime Salt (FODMAP and gluten free)

This low FODMAP and gluten free deviled egg recipes subs the mayo for lactose-free plain yogurt. The curry powder adds tons of flavor to the healthy filling, and a quick chile-lime sea salt makes this Easter appetizer look super special even though it takes minutes to make! Click through to get the recipe.

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What’s a better Easter appetizer than deviled eggs? First off, you avoid wasting all the eggs you used for dying - win! But deviled eggs are also healthy, easy to make low-FODMAP, and totally delicious.

I also like this easy app because you can play around with the ingredients to create different flavor profiles.

A recent favorite of mine is a curried deviled egg. Curry powder is a mild blend of spices typically used in Indian cooking - turmeric, cumin, coriander, cinnamon, ginger, nutmeg, fennel, cardamom, red pepper. 

There are endless variations on the curry spice blend, but what you’ll typically find in supermarkets is referred to as “sweet curry powder.” It’s an earthy soft-orange color and has a mild flavor.

Curry powder takes care of your seasoning, but I jazzed up these deviled eggs with homemade chile-lime salt. It’s a simple combo of sea salt, lime zest and chile powder that looks special even though it takes about a minute to make.

Curried Deviled Eggs with Chile-Lime Salt (FODMAP and gluten free)

I like using a combination of mayo and plain yogurt, but it’s equally good subbing additional yogurt for the mayo if you can’t find a low-FODMAP mayo option. Curry powder doesn’t typically contain high-FODMAP ingredients like onion or garlic, but it’s always a good idea to check.

Serves 6 - Recipe doubles easily!

INGREDIENTS

6 large or extra large eggs
2 tbsp FODMAP-free mayonnaise (see note above)
¼ cup plus 2 tbsp plain lactose-free yogurt
1 tsp curry powder
1/8 tsp plus 1 tsp sea salt
Zest of 1 lime (about 1 tsp)
Dash chile powder (chipotle, ancho, or cayenne pepper)
2 tbsp chopped cilantro

INSTRUCTIONS

1. Add eggs to a large saucepan and add water to cover by about 1 inch. Cover pan and bring to a boil. As soon as water reaches a full boil, remove from heat and rest, still covered for 13 minutes.

2. Fill a large bowl with ice water. Carefully remove eggs from pan and transfer to ice water; set aside until eggs are cool. Peel eggs (may be done up to 1 day ahead).

3. Cut eggs in half lengthwise and add yolks to a medium bowl. Add mayonnaise, yogurt, curry and ⅛ tsp of the sea salt, and stir until combined. Scoop filling into egg whites and place on a serving dish.

4. Combine remaining 1 tsp sea salt, lime zest and chile powder in a small bowl. Sprinkle deviled eggs with chile-lime salt (you may not use all the salt; season to your liking) and cilantro. Serve chilled or at room temp.

Slow Cooker Sweet and Sour Cocktail Meatballs (low-FODMAP recipe)

Slow Cooker Sweet and Sour Cocktail Meatballs (low-FODMAP recipe)

These easy slow cooker meatballs are low FODMAP and the perfect game day snack! With ground turkey and less sugar than most crockpot meatball recipes, they're healthy and can easily be made gluten-free. You'll love these for appetizers, tailgating, or you super bowl party. Click through to get the recipe!

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Mini cocktail meatballs are the perfect game day snack. Why?

  • You can make them ahead

  • They feed a crowd

  • You serve 'em straight from the slow cooker

  • Meatballs - enough said

Low-FODMAP AND Less Sugar

Tasty and convenient as they are, it's hard to find a recipe that's low-FODMAP and healthy. Most call for a few bottles of high-sugar condiments like chile sauce, ketchup, and even an entire jar of jam. 

You don't need sugary processed ingredients to make great meatballs for your super bowl party. The base of this sauce is plain, simple canned tomato sauce, seasoned up with spices, tamari, and garlic oil.

The sweet and sour kick comes from vinegar and just 1/3 cup of brown sugar in a recipe that makes 15 appetizer servings - pretty good nutrition stats!

To make delicate, tender meatballs it's important not to over mix, but also to choose ground meat that's not TOO lean. I used 85% lean ground turkey and a bit of beef to make it interesting. Any combination of turkey, beef, or pork would be delicious.

Make These FODMAP Appetizers Anytime

While they're a great football snack, these cocktail meatballs work year round. I wouldn't be sad to serve these at a summer cookout.

Since you make them in the slow cooker, you can keep them warm and serve them straight from the slow cooker. Or fancy it up with a pretty serving bowl - they'll disappear fast.

Do you have a favorite low-FODMAP appetizer? Do you struggle with finding party food that's appealing AND belly friendly? Let me know in the comments!

These easy slow cooker meatballs are low FODMAP and the perfect game day snack! With ground turkey and less sugar than most crockpot meatball recipes, they're healthy and can easily be made gluten-free. You'll love these for appetizers, tailgating, or you super bowl party. Click through to get the recipe!

Sweet and Sour Cocktail Meatballs (low-FODMAP)


If you can’t find unseasoned gluten-free bread crumbs can also make your own with toasted GF bread ground in the food processor. Plain canned tomato sauce is usually free of onion and garlic, but always check ingredients. 

Makes about 60
1 serving = 4 meatballs

INGREDIENTS

For meatballs:
Cooking spray or oil
1 large egg
1 ½ lbs ground turkey (85% lean)
½ lb ground beef (80-85% lean)
½ cup (80 grams) unseasoned gluten-free breadcrumbs (see note above)
2 tsp salt
1 ½ tsp paprika
1 ½ tsp ground ginger
1 ½ tsp ancho chile powder
½ tsp ground mustard powder
½ tsp freshly ground black pepper

For sauce:
15-oz can plain tomato sauce
⅓ cup packed light brown sugar
¼ cup red wine or white wine vinegar, plus additional to taste
2 tsp reduced sodium tamari or soy sauce
2 tsp garlic-infused oil
1 tsp ground ginger
1 tsp ground mustard powder
2 tsp cornstarch
3 tbsp water
Chopped fresh chives for garnish

INSTRUCTIONS

1. Preheat oven to 350F and arrange racks in upper and lower thirds. Line 2 large rimmed baking sheets with foil. If you have oven-proof metal racks that fit inside your baking sheets, use them and coat with cooking spray or oil; otherwise, generously coat the foil with cooking spray or oil. 

2. In a large bowl, whisk the egg. Add remaining meatball ingredients and gently mix until combined (over mixing causes meatballs to be tough). Roll meat mixture into balls, about 1-inch in diameter. Place on prepared baking sheets. Bake until meatballs are lightly browned, 20 minutes, switching positions of the baking sheets about halfway through.

3. Meanwhile, add all the sauce ingredient BEFORE cornstarch to a slow cooker and stir to combine. Add meatballs. Cover and cook on low for 1 hour and 40 minutes. Stir gently about halfway through cooking time.

4. In a small bowl, stir the cornstarch and water until cornstarch dissolves. Add to slow cooker and stir to combine. Continue cooking for 20 minutes or until sauce thickens slightly. Taste and check the seasoning, adding additional salt if desired. Add additional vinegar if you like a bigger sour kick. You can sprinkle with chives and serve from the slow cooker (set to warm) or transfer to a serving bowl.

Looking for FODMAP Recipes? Making Your Favorite Foods Low-FODMAP

Ultimate Guide to Making Your Favorite Recipes Low-FODMAP

I’m laying out every tip, trick, strategy and substitution I know to make crave-able, drool-worthy recipes that happen to be low-FODMAP. Click through to read the epic list of makeover strategies that starts with simple swaps and progresses to mini recipes (Blue Cheese Dressing! Citrus-Herb Marinade! Flavorful Tomato Sauce!) and creative flavor tactics. You can still eat the food you love and control your IBS on the fodmap diet!

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I love a good makeover (any What Not To Wear fans in here?), but even more than the fashion and style stuff, I love a recipe makeover. 

Want proof? Here you go…

recipe-makeover-ravioli.png

Yup, for over 3 years I wrote a monthly column for Clean Eating magazine where I revamped classic recipes to make them healthy and (obviously) clean. I loved this gig. But just because a recipe’s healthy doesn’t mean it’s IBS-friendly.

Lucky for you, making over your favorite foods into FODMAP recipes is NOT as hard as it seems. And you don’t need any ninja-chef skills to do it.

Psst >>> If you want to start the FODMAP Diet but feel overwhelmed, I created a FREE email course to ease you into it and give you the tools you need to succeed.

Click to sign up for the Free 7-Day FODMAP Jumpstart Challenge!

Why Recipe Makeovers?

It’s absolutely essential that you learn to make some of your favorite dishes low-FODMAP. Why? Because one of the biggest reasons people stumble in the first phase of the FODMAP Diet - the Elimination Phase - is the fear and sadness over giving up the food they love.

(I know this from experience - I wasted months before I finally did the Elimination Phase because giving up food was too sad.)

In this post, I’m laying out the best tips, tricks, strategies and substitutions I know to develop crave-able, drool-worthy FODMAP recipes. It's the foundation of the Calm Belly Kitchen Cookbook. And it’s how I got myself through the FODMAP Diet with zero deprivation.

This epic list of makeover strategies starts with simple swaps and progresses to mini recipes and creative flavor tactics.

Before you dive in, watch the video to see some of my personal favorite recipe makeover strategies and substitutions (If you love Italian and Mexican food, it's a must-see.). Then read the post with YOUR favorite recipes in mind.

If you remember one thing, make it this: Eating great food that you love is so do-able on the FODMAP Diet, and you’re not being sentenced to food prison without parole.


1) Replace Onion With Leek Tops: The green part is low-FODMAP, while the white part is high. Leeks have more flavor than onions, and you won’t cry when you cut them. Scallion tops are great too. The picture below show what part of the scallion or leek to use. Watch this video to learn how to wash leeks!

2) Replace Garlic With Garlic-Infused Oil: FODMAPs are water soluble, which means they soak out into liquids, but NOT fats. That’s why garlic oil is low-FODMAP. For the boldest flavor, add it at the end of the cooking process.

3) Build Flavor With Anchovies: At the start of the cooking process (when you’d normally sauté onion or garlic), sauté 1 tbsp anchovy paste or 2 to 3 oil-packed anchovies on medium heat in some olive oil.

4) Use Miso: Do the same thing as above with 1 to 2 tbsp of miso paste (especially good in soups and stews)

>>> This blog post has even more ways to replace onion and garlic and add big flavor to your recipes: The Ultimate Guide to Flavor Without Onion and Garlic

5) Add Bacon: It's the time-honored method for making any recipe irresistible.

6) Replace Mushrooms With Eggplant: The texture is similar, and it’s great sautéed, roasted or grilled.

7) Buy Chile Powders With 1 Ingredient: Some products called “chile powder” are blends that often include onion and garlic, which are high-FODMAP. Instead make sure yours only contains chiles. Ancho chile powder is mild and incredibly flavorful.

8) Substitute lactose-free milk anywhere you’d use regular milk: This is real cow’s milk treated with an enzyme to remove the lactose so it works just like regular milk in recipes.

9) Swap Your Veggies: Replace onion and celery with diced or grated carrot, celery root, leek, and/or red bell pepper (works great in recipes that call for the “holy trinity” of onion/celery/carrot)

10) Replace Ketchup: Many commercial ketchups contains high-fructose corn syrup and occasionally honey (both high-FODMAP)...but you've got options.

  • Here’s an easy recipe to DIY

  • Instead of ketchup, toss your oven fries with lemon zest, chopped parsley and garlic-infused oil - delish!

  • Do as the English do and dip fries in mayo (get fancy and mix in Dijon mustard, hot sauce, parsley, or lemon zest)

11) For Mexican Food

What low-FODMAP really looks like! Polenta Lasagna, Cobb Salad with Blue Cheese Dressing (both from    CBK Cookbook   ) and Huevos Rancheros.

What low-FODMAP really looks like! Polenta Lasagna, Cobb Salad with Blue Cheese Dressing (both from CBK Cookbook) and Huevos Rancheros.

12) Replace Chicken Broth: The store-bought stuff is SO convenient, but have you ever tasted it straight? Not all that flavorful. Instead, use water and add some of these flavor boosting ingredients:

Miso paste
Anchovy paste
Dried herbs and spices
Wine
Lemon juice and soy sauce (a killer combo)
Fish sauce

> But wait! Massels brand is onion/garlic-free. 

Or make homemade broth

13) For Marinades: Omit the onion and/or garlic - it will still do the job! Try this easy favorite of mine:                                           

Citrus-Herb Marinade

3 green scallion tops
Handful parsley leaves and stems (about 1/2 packed cup)
2 tbsp dijon mustard
1 tbsp hot sauce (optional) - here’s my fave low-FODMAP brand
1/2 tsp fish sauce
2 tbsp lemon juice
3 tbsp orange juice
2 tbsp rice or red wine vinegar
2 tbsp olive oil

Put all ingredients through vinegar in food processor and blitz. With processor on, slowly pour oil through feed tube. This marinade is great with just about anything, especially chicken and fish.

14) Make Your Own Spice Blends - Most store-bought blends contain onion and/or garlic powder. You can play with the amounts or add other spices you like. I promise, you can’t mess this up. Here’s a simple blend to start with (great for chicken and pork):            

Mild Mexican Spice Blend

1 tsp ancho chile powder
1 tsp cumin
1⁄2 tsp coriander
1⁄2 tsp dried oregano

For Italian Recipes

15) Make Your Own Tomato Sauce:

  1. Sauté chopped leek tops (the green part) in olive oil

  2. Add dried herbs and/or chile flakes

  3. Add ½ cup red wine and reduce (optional)

  4. Then add 1 can tomato sauce and 1 can diced tomatoes

  5. Simmer until slightly thickened

  6. Turn off heat and add fresh basil and garlic-infused oil to taste

Tip: A low-FODMAP serving of canned tomatoes is 1/2 cup.

16) Replace Pasta With Polenta or Risotto: There are some great gluten-free pastas out there too! My favorites are Jovial and Trader Joe’s brand.

17) For Pizza: Buy or make a low-FODMAP crust and top it with your homemade sauce (or do a white pizza with béchamel sauce - see the third idea below)

Three of my favorite topping ideas:

  • Mozzarella, prosciutto, roasted eggplant, goat cheese

  • Mozzarella, ground turkey, sautéed spinach, feta

  • Mozzarella, parmesan, sliced scallops, topped with arugula when it comes out of the oven (great with béchamel sauce)

18) Replace Cream Sauce With Low-FODMAP Béchamel: Here’s my easy recipe, and you can scale it up:

Low-FODMAP Béchamel Recipe

  1. Heat 1 tbsp butter or oil in a small saucepan on medium-low

  2. Add 1 tbsp gluten-free flour blend (must be free of gums, such as this one) or rice flour and stir until combined, about 1 minute

  3. Add 1 cup lactose-free milk and raise heat to medium high

  4. Whisk constantly, breaking up any flour clumps until milk comes to a simmer and sauce thickens

  5. Remove from heat and season with salt and pepper plus any herbs and spices you want

Use it for:

  • Cream soups like chowder

  • Cream sauces like Alfredo

  • Creamed greens

  • White pizza

  • Any recipe that calls for béchamel

19) Replace Creamy Dressings: It’s crazy-easy to make your own with lactose-free plain yogurt or kefir - the amounts are flexible, you can’t mess this up. Here’s an example:

Blue Cheese Dressing Recipe
Tip: Make it a Ranch dressing by swapping the blue cheese for parmesan and adding fresh chives and/or scallions.

3⁄4 cup lactose-free yogurt
3 tbsp lactose-free milk, plus more as needed
2 tbsp lemon juice
1 tbsp nutritional yeast (optional)
1⁄4 tsp sea salt
Freshly ground black pepper to taste
1⁄3 cup (about 1 1⁄2 oz) crumbled blue cheese
2 scallion tops, finely chopped

Stir together all ingredients. Add extra milk if you want a thinner consistency.

20) Learn the Cheese Trick! 

Plenty of cheeses are low-FODMAP, but not every possible variety has been tested by Monash yet. Here’s how to tell if a cheese is low in lactose:

1) Check the ingredients: If added sugars or high-FOMDAP ingredients like honey or garlic (this is common in cheese products or flavored cheeses, not so much in natural cheese). If it’s got ingredients added, this trick doesn’t apply.

Natural cheese DOES include things like: milk (or pasteurized milk), salt, cultures, enzymes, and possibly preservatives or natural colors.

2) Look at the Nutrition Facts. Go to the “sugars” line (lactose, the FODMAP you want to avoid is a sugar). If it contains 0 grams sugar, the cheese is either lactose-free or so very low in lactose that only an extremely sensitive person would have issues (in the US, if the sugar totals < 0.5 gram, manufacturers can round down to zero)

And that's a wrap! 20 cool, creative, delicious ways to makeover your favorite recipes. You don't have to give up everything yummy to do the FODMAP Diet, so don't let fear of missing out on great food hold you back from a calm belly.

What recipes are you going to makeover? Have questions? Leave a comment and let me help!

This post contains affiliate links.

Low-FODMAP Thumbprint Cookie Recipe

Low-FODMAP Thumbprint Cookie Recipe (gluten free, egg free)

These sweet little cookies are low FODMAP, gluten free, egg free and only call for 5 ingredients! They're ridiculously easy - what more could you want. The star ingredient is almond meal which keeps the cookies soft and tender. They're also low in sugar so you can enjoy a treat and stay healthy! Click through to get the 5 ingredient recipe.

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I love making Christmas cookies, and there's no need to give 'em up just because you're following a special diet. 

But these cookies aren't just low-FODMAP. They're better for you health-wise too. Here are all the reasons why you should add them to your cookie tray:

  • They're incredibly easy - Just 5 ingredients (plus salt!)

  • They're made with nutrient-packed almond meal, not flour

  • They're low in sugar

  • They're low-FODMAP, gluten-free and egg-free

  • They stay soft and tender for a few days (thanks to that almond meal), but they also freeze great

Convinced? Sure you are...on to the recipe!

>>> Psst! New to FODMAP? Click here to get started with the FREE 7-Day FODMAP Jumpstart so you can relieve IBS fast!

Low-FODMAP Almond Thumbprint Cookies (gluten free, egg free)

Adapted from this recipe by King Arthur Flour. 
A low-FODMAP serving of almonds is 12 grams, and the whole recipe uses 96 grams. King Arthur makes a super-fine almond flour, and if you use that the cookies will have a shortbread-like texture. Since I had almond meal on hand - and it's easier to find - that's what I used and it works great.

Makes 12 cookies - Recipe may be doubled
(1 serving=1 cookie)

INGREDIENTS

1 cup (96 grams) almond flour
3 1/2 tbsp  (49 g) unsalted butter, at room temp
3 tbsp (25 g) powdered sugar
1/4 tsp sea salt
1/2 tsp vanilla extract
4 tsp strawberry jam

INSTRUCTIONS

1. Preheat oven to 350°F. Line a baking sheet with parchment paper.

2. Add add all ingredients except jam to the bowl of an electric mixer and mix on medium speed until a cohesive dough forms (or mix by hand).

3. Scoop heaping teaspoons of dough and roll into 1 1/4-inch balls. Arrange on prepared baking sheet about 1 1/2 to 2-inches apart.

4. Use your thumb to make an indentation in the center of each ball of dough. Fill with 1/4 tsp jam (overfilling cookies will cause jam to boil over in the oven).

5. Bake 9 to 12 minutes, or until the edges of the cookies feel just set. Cookies will not brown much.

6. Remove the cookies from the oven and cool them on the pan for 10 minutes. Transfer them to a rack to cool completely before serving. Cookies keep at room temperature for 3 days or in the freezer for 3 weeks; defrost at room temp.

Want more EASY holiday treats? Check these out!

Orange-Pecan Cookies (low-FODMAP, gluten-free)

Fudgy One-Bowl Brownies (low-FODMAP, gluten-free)

 

 

3 Low-FODMAP Holiday Appetizer Recipes!

3 Low-FODMAP Holiday Appetizer Recipes!

Recipes for Eggplant Caponata, Crostini with Prosciutto, Sage, and Mozzarella and Steak-Blue Cheese Bites with Savory Grape Jam are ALL low FODMAP and they'll wow your guests for Thanksgiving and Christmas parties! Click through to get all 3 appetizer recipes!

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This is an epic post, so I'm keepin' the chit-chat short! 

You want beautiful, delish appetizers to serve at holiday parties, but the FODMAP Diet means you're stuck with carrot sticks, right? Wrong, sister! 

Here are 3 fun, drool-worthy and totally tasty apps you can make to create a whole meal of small plates or take with you to a holiday gathering. 

What's on the menu:

Eggplant Caponata: A tangy-sweet topper for crackers or crostini that's easier and healthier than the traditional version (Read the recipe headnote to see how it morphs into an amazing pasta sauce too!)

Crostini with Prosciutto, Mozzarella, and Sage Butter: I adapted this from a favorite Italian restaurant. It is my go-to appetizer, and I love it.

Steak and Blue Cheese Bites with Grape-Red Wine Sauce: The grape sauce is savory and so easy. Trust me on this one.

Ready? Let's do this!

Low FODMAP Eggplant Caponata is easy and healthier than traditional versions. It's a great make-ahead appetizer recipe that also can be morphed into an awesome pasta sauce.
Crostini with Prosciutto, Mozarella, and Sage Butter and made with sourdough bread so they're low-FODMAP. The perfect go-to holiday appetizer recipe if you're on the FODMAP diet.

Eggplant Caponata (Low-FODMAP)

If you have leftover caponata, here’s an insanely good way to use it as a pasta sauce: Cook spaghetti according to package directions and reserve about 1 cup of the cooking water before draining spaghetti. Toss hot spaghetti with caponata (for each 2-oz serving of pasta, use about ⅓ cup caponata), adding pasta water as needed to loosen caponata and create a sauce. Add any additions you want - I used Italian tuna and steamed Swiss chard, plus parmesan. 

Makes about 3 cups (1 serving = ½ cup)

INGREDIENTS

Cooking spray
1 ¼ lb eggplant, chopped into 1-inch chunks
Salt and freshly ground black pepper to taste
1 leek
1 tbsp olive oil
1 packed cup drained roasted red bell peppers (from jar), chopped into ½-inch pieces
⅓ cup green or kalamata olives (or a mix), chopped
2 tbsp capers
2 tbsp tomato paste
¼ cup red wine vinegar
2 tbsp lemon juice
⅓ cup water
8 to 10 basil leaves, chopped

INSTRUCTIONS

1. Preheat oven to 400F and line a large rimmed baking sheet with foil. Mist foil with cooking spray and add eggplant. Coat eggplant with cooking spray and season with salt and pepper. Roast until lightly browned and very tender, tossing once or twice, 25 to 30 min.

2. Remove leek’s tough outer leaves and trim off a couple inches from the top. Chop remaining green (and light green if desired) parts to total about 1 cup chopped and wash thoroughly (discard white part).

3. Heat the oil in a large skillet on medium heat. Add leeks, season with salt and pepper, and cook, stirring occasionally until tender, 6 to 7 minutes. Add roasted peppers, olives, capers, tomato paste, red wine vinegar, and lemon juice; stir to combine. Stir in roasted eggplant and water and bring to a simmer. Simmer on medium-low heat, stirring occasionally, until liquid reduces and flavors blend, about 5 minutes (mixture will be thick, but you don’t need to reduce liquid completely).

4. Remove from heat. Stir in about half the basil and check seasoning. Serve with sourdough bread, gluten-free crackers or endive leaves. Garnish with remaining basil. May be made up to 3 days ahead; cover and refrigerate. Serve warm or at room temp.

Crostini with Prosciutto, Mozzarella and Sage Butter (Low-FODMAP) 

Traditional, slow-rise sourdough bread is low-FODMAP because the fermentation process consumes the fructans (aka FODMAPs) in the wheat. If the bread contains yeast or enzymes, this doesn't apply because they're added to speed up the fermentation process.

Makes 24 (1 serving = 3 pieces)

INGREDIENTS

Cooking spray
24 ¼-inch slices sourdough baguette (or low-FODMAP bread of choice)
4 to 5 oz prosciutto, torn into bite-size pieces
5 to 6 oz fresh mozzarella, thinly sliced
Freshly ground black pepper
4 tbsp butter
14 sage leaves, finely sliced (chiffonade)

INSTRUCTIONS

1. Preheat broiler to high and position rack in the center of the oven (not too close to broiler). Line a large, rimmed baking sheet with foil and mist with cooking spray. Place bread on foil and mist with cooking spray. Broil until light golden brown and crisp, 3 to 5 minutes, turning about halfway through (watch carefully, they burn fast!).

2. Top bread with enough prosciutto pieces to mostly cover it, then top with mozzarella. Season with black pepper. Return to broiler and cook until cheese is melted, 1 to 2 minutes.

3. In a medium skillet, melt the butter on just-above-medium heat. Add sage and cook, swirling pan occasionally, until sage is crisp, about 2 minutes. Transfer crostini to a serving plate. Drizzle the butter and bits of sage (you may have some leftover) over the crostini and serve.

Bite-size steak skewers with blue cheese are served with savory grape-red wine sauce and fresh basil. This flavor combo is amazing. The perfect FODMAP holiday appetizer recipe!

Steak & Blue Cheese Bites with Grape-Red Wine Sauce (Low-FODMAP)

Any cut of steak you like that can be sliced into thin strips will work in this recipe. Buy the larger amount if you’ll be trimming extra fat, like on a NY Strip for example. I like the slightly milder flavor of Gorgonzola, but choose any blue cheese that’s not overly crumbly works great.

Serves 8 (1 serving= 3 pieces)

INGREDIENTS

Cooking spray
1 1/4 to 1 1/2 lb NY Strip, top sirloin or flank steak, trimmed
Salt and freshly ground black pepper to taste
5 oz gorgonzola or other blue cheese, cut into ½-inch chunks
Grape-Red Wine Sauce (recipe follows)

INSTRUCTIONS

1. Prepare a grill. Bring steak to room temp, mist with cooking spray and season with salt and pepper. Cook to desired doneness (time depends on thickness and cut of steak), 140F on an instant-read thermometer for medium-rare. Rest 5 to 10 minutes.

2. Cutting against the grain, slice steak approximately 1/8-inch thick. Wrap each piece around a piece of cheese and skewer onto a toothpick. Serve with grape-red wine sauce.

Grape-Red Wine Sauce

Dream up other ways to use this sauce...how about on a sandwich or paired with other cheeses?

Serves 8 (1 serving=2 tbsp)

INGREDIENTS

1 lb red seedless grapes
¼ cup red wine
2 tbsp balsamic vinegar
Salt and freshly ground black pepper

INSTRUCTIONS

1. Add grapes to a medium saucepan. Add just enough water to thinly cover the bottom of the pan. Bring to a simmer. Simmer on medium heat, stirring occasionally, until grapes releases their juices and begin to soften and break down, about 20 minutes.

2. Add wine and balsamic vinegar. Continue simmering until sauce is thick and grapes are very soft, 10 to 15 minutes more. Season to taste with salt and pepper. Serve warm or at room temp.

Low-FODMAP Pad Thai and Cantaloupe-Shrimp Salad

Low-FODMAP Pad Thai and               Cantaloupe-Shrimp Salad

This Thai menu is healthy AND low FODMAP! Your main dish is tasty Pad Thai Noodles with chicken and shrimp, plus Cantaloupe-Cucumber Salad with Shrimp (and a tangy Asian dressing) on the side. This menu proves you can relieve IBS without deprivation!

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Pad thai is not only easy to make low-FODMAP, but it's easier to make at home than you might think.

Once you get the hang of it, you'll prefer your homemade version over takeout - no more greasy noodles mixed with a few skimpy shrimp. My recipe has plenty of healthy protein and the sauce adds tons of sweet-tart flavor.

Psst! Just getting started with FODMAP? Click here to join the FREE 7-Day Cleanse & learn to feel better fast!

Pad Thai noodles are a classic, but the cantaloupe salad is my own invention. It's cool, refreshing, and a nice change from lettuce.

You can serve both dishes together as a full menu, but sometimes I just make the Pad Thai. The recipe has a lot of components (sauce, noodles, protein, eggs, garnishes...whew!), but once you start cooking it comes together FAST. Have all those ingredients ready to go!

Have you ever made Pad Thai? What other Thai dishes would you like to make low-FODMAP? Leave a comment and let me know!

You might also like The Ultimate FODMAP Guide to Flavor without Onion and Garlic

If you like these recipes, check out the Calm Belly Kitchen Cookbook

Low-FODMAP Pad Thai

I use a very large (13-inch) straight-sided saute pan for this dish (this one specifically). If you don't have a saute pan or wok large enough to fit all the ingredients, add the chicken and shrimp mixture to the large pot you cooked the noodles in and proceed with the recipe from there. There are substitutions for tamarind concentrate, but none of them will give you the uniquely tart, fruity flavor. You can buy it in ethnic food stores or online here and here.

Makes 4 large low-FODMAP servings (about 2 cups each), or 6 smaller servings (recipe may be halved)

INGREDIENTS

2 ½ tsp tamarind concentrate/paste
3 tbsp hot water
3 tbsp fish sauce
2 tbsp lime juice (1 to 2 limes)
2 tbsp white or light brown sugar
3 extra large eggs
Salt and freshly ground black pepper to taste
8 oz pad thai noodles
Neutral oil or cooking spray
12 oz boneless skinless chicken breast, sliced thin
4 oz small cooked shrimp, defrosted if necessary and patted dry
2 cups bean sprouts, divided
1/3 cup peanuts, chopped
6 scallion tops, sliced, divided
½ cup (packed) cilantro, chopped, divided
Lime wedges for serving


INSTRUCTIONS

1. In a small bowl or glass liquid measuring cup, whisk together the tamarind concentrate and hot water. Add the fish sauce, lime juice and sugar. Whisk until combined and set aside. In a medium bowl, beat the eggs and season lightly with salt and pepper (fish sauce is high in salt, so season conservatively); set aside.

2. Meanwhile, bring a large pot of water to a boil. Add the noodles and cook until al dente, 3 to 4 minutes (or according to package directions). Drain in a colander and rinse thoroughly with cold water.

3. In a large sauté pan (see recipe head note), heat a thin layer of oil (or use cooking spray) on medium high heat. Add the chicken, season lightly with salt and pepper and cook, stirring frequently until cooked through, 4 to 5 minutes. Add the shrimp and stir until just heated through, about 1 minute. 

4. Reduce heat to medium and push the chicken and shrimp to the edges of the pan. Add about 2 tsp of oil or mist the center of the pan with cooking spray. Add the eggs. Cook until just beginning to set (reduce heat if eggs are cooking very quickly). Start breaking the eggs up with your spatula; you should still have some runny/liquid bits at this point. Add the noodles, 1 cup of the bean sprouts, half the peanuts, half the scallions, and half of the cilantro. Gently fold all the ingredients together until eggs are set.

5. Give the tamarind mixture another quick whisk and add to the pan. Stir until combined and most of the sauce is absorbed (sauce will continue to absorb as pad thai cools). Serve immediately and garnish with remaining bean sprouts, peanuts, scallions, cilantro and lime wedges.

This Thai Cantaloupe-Cucumber Salad with Shrimp (and a tangy Asian dressing)&nbsp;is part of my healthy AND low FODMAP Thai menu! Your main dish is tasty Pad Thai Noodles with chicken and shrimp.&nbsp;Click through to get both recipes!
These Pad Thai noodles with chicken and shrimp are part of my healthy AND low FODMAP Thai menu! Your side dish is Thai Cantaloupe-Cucumber Salad with Shrimp (and a tangy Asian dressing).&nbsp;Click through to get both recipes!

Thai Cantaloupe & Cucumber Salad with Shrimp

I bought a Thai basil plant this year and that's what I used, but regular basil or mint (or a combo) would be just as tasty.

Serves 5 (1 serving = about 1 cup)

INGREDIENTS

1 ½ c chopped English cucumber (192 grams)
1 ½ c matchstick-cut or grated carrots (168 grams)
1 ½ c chopped cantaloupe (250 grams)
1 cup bean sprouts (82 grams)
10 small cooked shrimp, defrosted if necessary and patted dry
3 tbsp lime juice (from 2 limes)
1 tbsp reduced sodium soy sauce
1 tbsp fish sauce
3 tbsp brown sugar
¼ cup (packed) fresh Thai basil, basil, or mint leaves, chopped

INSTRUCTIONS

1. In a large bowl, combine cucumber, carrots, cantaloupe, bean sprouts and shrimp. In a small bowl, whisk together lime juice, soy sauce, fish sauce and brown sugar.

2. Add sauce and chopped herbs to salad mixture and stir gently to combine. Best served right away; may be covered and refrigerated up to 1 day.

Low-FODMAP Spanish Tapas Menu

Low-FODMAP Spanish Tapas Menu

Click through for recipes for Smoked Paprika Chicken Skewers with Romesco Sauce, Lemon-Garlic Shrimp, Marinated Olives, Sourdough Toasts and more! If you're a foodie who loves eating with friends, you don't have to give up the fun or the flavor on the low fodmap diet. This low FODMAP Spanish Tapas Menu is perfect even in the elimination and reintroduction phase.

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Whenever a vacation is coming up and I’m looking for good restaurants to try, I will always scout out the best tapas bars. I don’t care if we’re hitting up Boston, Madrid or Wilmington, North Carolina. If I’m going to be eating out, any restaurant with a great meat and cheese plate is my #1 choice.

That’s exactly how it was on my last trip...People like to say London isn’t a great foodie destination, but that must be because they’re eating actual English food in England. I can point you to a very tasty tapas place, as well as a legit pintxos bar just off the beaten path. I ate at both of them twice. In 7 days. 

Tapas Without FODMAPs

It’s very do-able to go out for tapas and keep the FODMAPs in check (the aforementioned charcuterie plate is great way to go). However. I passionately believe that eating is one of the best things we get to do as humans, and every meal should be a tiny celebration of that.  

So let’s bring the tapas directly to your kitchen where you get to choose the ingredients and keep those FODMAPs low, low, low. This menu is what life can look like on the FODMAP diet--even in the elimination and reintroduction phases. 

Forget the notion that low-FODMAP cooking equals a depressing plate of steamed rice, plain grilled chicken and 12 green beans. When you do the FODMAP diet, there’s a very good chance you’ll have to change the way you cook and eat. But it doesn’t need to be a change for the worse! 

This is at the core of how I coach clients through the FODMAP diet>>>No giving up great meals OR missing out on the soul-nourishing social aspects of eating.

 The Menu

This menu would please even the most jaded judge on Top Chef (okay, maybe not Padma; is she ever in a good mood?), but more importantly YOU won’t feel deprived even though there isn’t a garlic clove in sight. 

The best part about tapas is that you don’t have to cook every last thing. I’ve got 4 simple recipes (plus sourdough toasts), AND 2 no-cook tapas to fill out your menu. 

Are you a tapas junkie like me, or is this type of meal new to you? Either way, invite some friends over to try out these recipes--they will never think you’re on a restricted diet.

Low FODMAP lemon-garlic shrimp for a Spanish tapas menu.


Lemon-Garlic Shrimp

This classic dish is on nearly every tapas menu, and all it takes is some lovely garlic-infused oil! And since most restaurants don’t bother adding finely grated, fresh lemon zest, yours might just be superior.

Serves 4 to 6

1 large lemon, rinsed well and dried
1 lb medium shrimp, peeled and deveined
Salt and freshly ground black pepper to taste
1 tbsp olive oil or cooking spray
2 tsp garlic-infused oil
1 tbsp chopped fresh parsley
Thyme sprigs for garnish

1. With a vegetable peeler, peel off one (3-inch) strip of the skin (the “zest”) and reserve for garnish. Zest the rest of the lemon with a microplane grater and set aside. Squeeze about 2 tbsp juice from the lemon and set aside.

2. Pat the shrimp dry with paper towels and season with salt and pepper. Heat the oil in a large skillet on medium-high, or mist skillet with cooking spray. 

3. Add shrimp and cook without moving until bottom sides are golden brown, 2 to 3 minutes (Cook shrimp in 2 batches if necessary to avoid crowding the pan and get better browning). Turn and repeat on opposite side until shrimp are opaque in the thickest part, 2 to 3 minutes more. Transfer to a large bowl.

4. To the bowl, add garlic oil, parsley, lemon zest, and lemon juice; stir gently to combine. Transfer to a serving bowl, garnish with lemon strip and thyme, and enjoy.

Olives marinated with orange zest, dried chiles and herbs.


Marinated Olives

These look so pretty on the table--like you paid too much for them at a fancy deli. I’m giving you two options here, depending on the time you want to spend. Both work, but you will get more flavor with the heat method.

Serves 4 to 6

1 naval orange
1 cup extra virgin olive oil
3 small dried red chiles
2 dried bay leaves
4 sprigs fresh thyme, plus additional for garnish
⅔ cup large green olives, pitted
⅔ cup kalamata olives, pitted

1. With a vegetable peeler, peel the skin (the “zest”) off the orange in 3 to 4-inch strips. Juice the orange until you have about 2 tbsp juice. Refrigerate juice until step 3.

2. Shortcut method: To a shallow bowl or baking dish, add the orange zest strips and remaining ingredients. Cover and refrigerate overnight (it’s okay if you only have a few hours to do this, but longer is better).

Heat method: Add 1 cup oil to a medium saucepan and heat on medium-low. When oil is shimmering and viscous (do not let it get steamy or start smoking; lower the heat if needed), add the orange zest strips, dried chiles, bay leaves, and 4 thyme sprigs. Reduce heat to low and wait 2 minutes. Remove from heat. Set aside until cool.

Add olives to a shallow bowl or baking dish and add the oil mixture. Cover and marinate at room temp for up to 1 hour or refrigerate overnight.

3. Whatever method you used, bring olives to room temp if chilled. With a slotted spoon transfer to a serving bowl; add a few tablespoons of the oil to bowl, but not all of it. Add reserved 2 tbsp orange juice and stir gently to combine. Garnish with additional fresh thyme and serve. 

NOTE: You can use the remaining oil marinade for dipping, or anywhere you would use olive oil. It will keep in the refrigerator (do not leave at room temp or bacteria can grow) up to 1 week. 

A plate of tapas with Smoked Paprika Chicken Skewers and Romesco Sauce. All the recipes are low FODMAP!


Romesco Sauce

This thick sauce, build around roasted vegetables and nuts, usually includes garlic, as well as stale bread as a thickener. My version is lighter and brighter thanks to plenty of veg, which means more room for Manchego.

Serves 4 to 6 (makes about 1 ½ cups)

1 dried ancho chile pepper or 1 ½ tsp ancho chile powder
⅓ cup (generous) walnuts (about 45 grams)
Cooking spray
1 red bell pepper, seeded and cut into 3 to 4 pieces
2 medium tomatoes, halved
5 scallion tops
2 tbsp extra-virgin olive oil
1 tbsp garlic oil
1 tbsp red wine vinegar
Salt and freshly ground black pepper to taste

1. If using dried ancho chile, place in a small bowl and cover with boiling water. Soak 15 minutes or until soft. Pat dry with paper towels. Cut open the chile and remove the stem and as many seeds as you like (anchos aren’t very spicy). Set aside.

2. Preheat oven to 325F. Spread walnuts on a baking sheet and bake until fragrant and lightly toasted, 8 to 10 minutes, tossing nuts around the baking sheet about halfway through. Set aside and cool completely (maybe done up to several days ahead). When cool, roughly chop walnuts and reserve 1 tbsp for garnish.

3. Raise oven temp to 425F. Line a large rimmed baking sheet with foil (optional, to minimize clean up) and mist with cooking spray. Add bell pepper, tomatoes and scallions; mist with cooking spray and season with salt and pepper. Roast each veggie until browned and very tender, removing from oven as needed: about 12 minutes for the scallions; about 32 minutes for the tomatoes; about 38 minutes for the peppers. When peppers are cool enough to handle, peel off the skin and discard.

4. To the bowl of a food processor, add all but 1 tbsp walnuts and pulse until roughly chopped. Add the ancho chile if using, the roasted veggies, and the remaining ingredients (if using chile powder add it now). Blitz until you have a slightly chunky puree. Romesco sauce should be thick but easy to dollop off a spoon (not quite as thick as hummus). Add water, 1 tablespoon at a time, to thin as needed (I used 2 to 3 tbsp).

5. Transfer sauce to a serving bowl and garnish with reserved walnuts. Serve with chicken skewers. May be made up to 1 day ahead and refrigerated. Serve at room temp.

Smoked Paprika Chicken Skewers

Smoked paprika is a major flavor in Spanish cooking, and it doesn’t resemble the common red stuff you’re probably familiar with. It’s incredibly smoky, earthy, and almost pungent (and it’s readily available in most supermarkets). Soaking the skewers is an extra safety measure to keep them from catching fire.

Serves 4 to 6

12 small bamboo/wooden skewers (6-inch), soaked in water for at least 30 minutes
6 boneless, skinless chicken thighs (about 1 ⅓ lbs)
1 tbsp smoked paprika
2 tsp cumin
1 tsp dried oregano
Salt and freshly ground black pepper to taste
Cooking spray

1. Cut each chicken thigh into 4 strips, trimming off any large bits of excess fat as you go. Thread chicken onto skewers, using 2 strips per skewer. In a small bowl, combine paprika, cumin, oregano and salt and pepper.

2. Preheat broiler to high and position rack in upper third of oven. Alternatively, you can cook the chicken on an outdoor grill. Coat a large, rimmed baking sheet or broiler pan with foil and mist with cooking spray. Place chicken skewers on the baking sheet and coat both sides with cooking spray. Sprinkle spice blend all over chicken and use your hands to rub into the meat.

3. Broil or grill until chicken is opaque in the thickest part, 3 to 4 minutes per side. Transfer to a serving dish and serve with Romesco sauce.


Crispy Sourdough Toasts

Traditionally made, slow-rise sourdough is low-FODMAP (the sugars are consumed by yeast during the fermentation process)! If prefer, gluten-free bread or crackers, those would be fabulous too. Baking the toasts until they are completely crisp allows you to make them ahead of time if needed. 

1 sourdough baguette, sliced
Olive oil cooking spray

Preheat oven to 375F. Coat a large, rimmed baking sheet with foil and mist with cooking spray. Add bread in a single layer and mist both sides with cooking spray. Bake until deep golden brown on both sides, and very crisp, 12 to 14 minutes, turning about halfway through. Serve immediately or cool and store in an airtight container up to 6 hours (toasts will stay crisp like crackers).

No-Cook Tapas

Fill out your menu with these delicious options--just shop and assemble!

Manchego cheese with cured ham and quince paste is the perfect no-cook tapa.

Cheese and Charcuterie Plate 

The classic options are Manchego (an aged sheep’s milk cheese) and jamon serrano. When I went shopping, there was no serrano, so what you see in the picture is actually speck, or smoked prosciutto. Regular prosciutto is great too. If you’re feeling very fancy, you can splurge on jamon iberico.

The pink jelly squares are quince paste, a classic accompaniment, which has actually been tested for FODMAP content by Monash (½ tbsp or 13 grams is green light, and 1 tbsp is yellow)! It’s very sweet, like jam, so you only need a little to pair with the meat and cheese for amazing salty/sweet contrast.

Boquerones, Spanish anchovies marinated in vinegar oil, skewered on toothpicks with piquillo peppers. An amazing no-cook tapa!

Boquerones Skewers

The little fish on toothpicks are Spanish-style marinated anchovies, or boquerones. These are amazing, and taste nothing like the super-salty anchovies typically used for Caesar salad. They can be hard to find (I got them at Whole Foods), but Spanish-style tuna would be the perfect alternative (pretty much any canned or processed seafood from Spain is insanely good). If the tuna isn’t firm enough to stay on the toothpicks, stuff it inside the peppers.

The little red peppers are piquillos, which are both sweet and a little spicy. If you can’t find them (try Trader Joe’s or the olive bar at a nice supermarket), substitute roasted red bell peppers. To serve, I drizzled garlic oil over the boquerones skewers and sprinkled on some parsley.