seafood

Easy Coconut-Shrimp Curry with Chickpeas (low FODMAP, dairy free)

Easy Coconut-Shrimp Curry with Chickpeas (low FODMAP, dairy free)

You don't 20 ingredients or 3 hours to make a DELICIOUS low fodmap curry with coconut milk, chickpeas, and potatoes. Vegetarian or vegan option is easy too! With cooking techniques and spices that maximize flavor, you will love this weeknight meal! #fodmap #IBS

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This low-FODMAP curry has a satisfying creamy texture thanks to coconut milk. But it’s also packed with flavor from a few carefully chosen spices. 

If you think high-FODMAP ingredients like garlic, onion, or store-bought broth are necessary for a tasty curry, you’re going to like this recipe.

This post is part of the Low-FODMAP Spices Series, and I chose to highlight coriander with an easy weeknight curry. 

Check out the other posts in the Low-FODMAP Spices Series:

Grilled Chicken with Curry-Lime Marinade

Ancho-Orange Roast Chicken and Spaghetti Squash

Maple-Soy Chicken Drumsticks with 5 Spice

What does coriander taste like and how do you use it?

You’ve likely tasted coriander, but you may not know it - It’s frequently paired and blended with other spices, but sometimes I like making it the star of the show.

It’s a common mate for cumin and chile powder in Mexican cooking. It also makes frequent appearances in Indian recipes, as well as their signature spice blends like garam masala and curry seasoning.

Coriander has a warm, earthy, slightly citrusy flavor with a sour edge in the background (It comes from the same plant as fresh cilantro leaves, but they taste completely different.). Some people taste lemon, but I get a hint of orange, and I love pairing coriander and orange zest. 

It’s fun to select your own curry spices rather than buying the standard yellow “curry powder,” because you can highlight your favorite flavors. And you don’t need to fuss with 10 different spices (exhausting!).

Along with the mellow, earthy coriander, I used cumin for smokiness and depth plus turmeric for that bright yellow color and tangy flavor. As with all spices, make sure they’re fresh so you get the full flavor. 

Here a few more ways you can use coriander:

  • Pair with thyme and orange zest as a rub for roast turkey, chicken or pork
  • Pair with cumin and ancho chile powder, and use Mexican dishes
  • Season vegetables for roasting - Try potatoes, acorn squash, spaghetti squash, carrots, eggplant, or rutabaga
  • Try it in creamy parsnip-potato or carrot soup
  • Spice up rice pilaf

The trio of spices in this curry is definitely a major flavor factor, but cooking technique also makes a HUGE difference.

Here’s how I built flavor during the cooking process:

  1. I sauteed the leek until lightly browned to bring out its sweetness, then added the jalapeno, ginger and some of the spices just until combined. I took this mixture OUT of the pan and added it back at the very end so the flavors stayed fresh and bold. 
  2. I seasoned at every stage of the cooking process.
  3. I sauteed the potatoes, carrots, tomatoes, and spices BEFORE adding any liquid so the spices would have a chance to toast and the vegetables would develop more flavor. The picture below is exactly what that looks like - YUM right?

You can use these techniques in all sorts of recipes!

Easy Coconut-Shrimp Curry with Chickpeas (low FODMAP, dairy free)

You can omit the shrimp and add an extra potato to make this dish vegan, or substitute chicken for the shrimp. To prep the leek, cut off the white part and discard the tough outer layers. Here’s the best leek washing technique. In a pinch, you can sub scallion tops for the leek, but cook them for 30 seconds at most. 

Serves 4

INGREDIENTS

2 tbsp oil or ghee, divided
1 leek top (green part only), chopped (see note)
Salt and freshly ground black pepper to taste
1 jalapeno, chopped (optional, see note)
1-inch piece fresh ginger, peeled and finely chopped
1 tbsp ground coriander, divided
2 tsp ground cumin, divided
1 medium Russet potato (about 8 oz), peeled and cut into 1-inch chunks (about 2 cups)
2 medium carrots, sliced (about 1 cup)
1 large tomato (about 8 oz), chopped (about 1 cup)
1 1/2 tsp turmeric
1 1/2 cups water
1 (13.5 oz) can coconut milk, regular or light
1 slightly heaping cup canned and rinsed chickpeas (168 g)
3/4 pound medium shrimp
1/2 lime
Chopped fresh cilantro for serving

INSTRUCTIONS

1. Heat 1 tbsp of the oil in a large sauce pan or Dutch oven on medium heat. Add leek, season with salt and pepper and cook, stirring frequently, until lightly browned, about 5 minutes. Add jalapeno, ginger, and ½ tsp EACH of the coriander and cumin. Cook until jalapeno softens, 1 to 2 minutes. Transfer to a small bowl and set aside.

2. Add remaining oil to pan and raise heat to medium high. Add potato and carrots, season with salt and pepper and cook, stirring frequently, until carrots softens slightly, about 5 minutes. Add tomato, remaining coriander, remaining cumin, and turmeric; season with salt and pepper. Cook, stirring frequently, until tomato breaks down and becomes saucy, 5 to 6 minutes.

3. Add water. Raise heat to high and bring to a boil. Add coconut milk and bring to a boil. Add chickpeas. Reduce heat to medium/medium-high and cook, uncovered, at a steady simmer until potatoes and carrots are tender, about 10 minutes. 

4. Add shrimp and simmer, stirring occasionally, until opaque in the thickest part, 2 to 3 minutes. Stir in reserved leek mixture and remove from heat. Stir in juice of half a lime. Taste for seasoning and add salt and pepper if desired. Serve over Perfect Basmati Rice (recipe below) and garnish with cilantro.

Perfect Basmati Rice

You can use brown basmati if you prefer; follow cooking instructions on the package.

Serves 4 to 6

1 tbsp unsalted butter
1 cup white basmati rice
2 cups water
½ tsp salt

In a medium saucepan, melt butter on medium heat. Add rice and cook, stirring frequently, until grains become partially opaque, about 2 minutes. Add water and salt. Raise heat to high and bring to a boil. Reduce heat to lowest setting, cover, and cook for 17 minutes. With cover still in place, rest 10 minutes. Fluff with a fork and serve.
 

Lemon-Caper Fish and Veggies Grilled in Foil Packets (Low-FODMAP Recipe)

Lemon-Caper Fish and Veggies Grilled in Foil Packets (Low-FODMAP Recipe)

This simple foil packet method is the easiest way to cook delicate fish and veggies on the grill. This low FODMAP recipe is healthy, fast and a great choice when you're eating for IBS.

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Need a simple, healthy grilling recipe that happens to be low-FODMAP? If you've ever tried to cook delicate white fish on the grill, there's a good chance you've ended up with a hot mess. I definitely have!

This simple foil packet method not only solves that problem, but it also gives you super-moist fish and flavorful veggies. It's a full meal in a packet!

The lemon and caper topping creates a delicious broth that doubles as a sauce...next time I'll likely transfer the entire contents of the packets into shallow bowls so I can catch every drop.

For the veggies I chose zucchini and red bell pepper, but you can change it up! Other great options are shredded carrots, kale, Swiss chard or green beans. You could also swap the lemon-caper topping for your favorite herbs and spices. It's the cooking method that's the star in this dish.

>>> Need to make food shopping on the FODMAP Diet a little easier? I created a free shopping list of everyday food you can find at most supermarkets (plus links to some of my favorite low-FODMAP recipes!). Click to grab it!

 

Looking for more low-FODMAP grilling recipes? Check out Caprese Salad with Grilled Eggplant or the Grilled Steak with Chimichurri Sauce!

Lemon-Caper Fish and Veggies Grilled in Foil Packs

Serves 2 (double recipe if needed)

This recipe works with especially well with delicate fish fillets that can be difficult to cook directly on the grill rack. I used whitefish fillets, but cod, tilapia, trout, or snapper would all work well - skin on or off.

INGREDIENTS

Cooking spray
1 medium zucchini, sliced thin
½ red bell pepper, sliced thin
Salt and freshly ground black pepper to taste
2 6-ounce fish fillets (see note above)
1 tsp olive oil
1 tbsp capers, chopped
1 lemon, sliced thin and seeds removed
Chopped parsley, basil, tarragon or cilantro for serving

INSTRUCTIONS

1. Prepare a charcoal or gas grill (medium-high for gas). Tear off two pieces of foil, 20-22 inches long each. If fish fillets are long and narrow, cut in half crosswise.

2. Place half the zucchini and bell pepper in the center of each piece of foil. Season with salt and pepper. Place fish on top of veggies. If you cut fillets into two pieces, place side by side. Drizzle with olive oil and season with salt and pepper. Top with capers and lemon slices.

3. Fold long sides of foil together and fold over to seal. Fold over each short end several times to seal tightly.

4. Place foil packets on grill and cook until fish is opaque in thickest part, 9 to 13 minutes. Thin, skinless fish will cook faster than thicker pieces or pieces with skin. Since the steam inside the packets is mainly responsible for cooking the fish, it’s difficult to dry out your fish with this method. The whitefish I used took 11 minutes. Place packets on plates or in shallow bowls and rest unopened for 5-10 minutes. Open carefully (steam will be hot), sprinkle with fresh herbs, and serve.
 

Low-FODMAP Pad Thai and Cantaloupe-Shrimp Salad

Low-FODMAP Pad Thai and               Cantaloupe-Shrimp Salad

This Thai menu is healthy AND low FODMAP! Your main dish is tasty Pad Thai Noodles with chicken and shrimp, plus Cantaloupe-Cucumber Salad with Shrimp (and a tangy Asian dressing) on the side. This menu proves you can relieve IBS without deprivation!

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Pad thai is not only easy to make low-FODMAP, but it's easier to make at home than you might think.

Once you get the hang of it, you'll prefer your homemade version over takeout - no more greasy noodles mixed with a few skimpy shrimp. My recipe has plenty of healthy protein and the sauce adds tons of sweet-tart flavor.

Psst! Just getting started with FODMAP? Click here to join the FREE 7-Day Cleanse & learn to feel better fast!

Pad Thai noodles are a classic, but the cantaloupe salad is my own invention. It's cool, refreshing, and a nice change from lettuce.

You can serve both dishes together as a full menu, but sometimes I just make the Pad Thai. The recipe has a lot of components (sauce, noodles, protein, eggs, garnishes...whew!), but once you start cooking it comes together FAST. Have all those ingredients ready to go!

Have you ever made Pad Thai? What other Thai dishes would you like to make low-FODMAP? Leave a comment and let me know!

You might also like The Ultimate FODMAP Guide to Flavor without Onion and Garlic

If you like these recipes, check out the Calm Belly Kitchen Cookbook

Low-FODMAP Pad Thai

I use a very large (13-inch) straight-sided saute pan for this dish (this one specifically). If you don't have a saute pan or wok large enough to fit all the ingredients, add the chicken and shrimp mixture to the large pot you cooked the noodles in and proceed with the recipe from there. There are substitutions for tamarind concentrate, but none of them will give you the uniquely tart, fruity flavor. You can buy it in ethnic food stores or online here and here.

Makes 4 large low-FODMAP servings (about 2 cups each), or 6 smaller servings (recipe may be halved)

INGREDIENTS

2 ½ tsp tamarind concentrate/paste
3 tbsp hot water
3 tbsp fish sauce
2 tbsp lime juice (1 to 2 limes)
2 tbsp white or light brown sugar
3 extra large eggs
Salt and freshly ground black pepper to taste
8 oz pad thai noodles
Neutral oil or cooking spray
12 oz boneless skinless chicken breast, sliced thin
4 oz small cooked shrimp, defrosted if necessary and patted dry
2 cups bean sprouts, divided
1/3 cup peanuts, chopped
6 scallion tops, sliced, divided
½ cup (packed) cilantro, chopped, divided
Lime wedges for serving


INSTRUCTIONS

1. In a small bowl or glass liquid measuring cup, whisk together the tamarind concentrate and hot water. Add the fish sauce, lime juice and sugar. Whisk until combined and set aside. In a medium bowl, beat the eggs and season lightly with salt and pepper (fish sauce is high in salt, so season conservatively); set aside.

2. Meanwhile, bring a large pot of water to a boil. Add the noodles and cook until al dente, 3 to 4 minutes (or according to package directions). Drain in a colander and rinse thoroughly with cold water.

3. In a large sauté pan (see recipe head note), heat a thin layer of oil (or use cooking spray) on medium high heat. Add the chicken, season lightly with salt and pepper and cook, stirring frequently until cooked through, 4 to 5 minutes. Add the shrimp and stir until just heated through, about 1 minute. 

4. Reduce heat to medium and push the chicken and shrimp to the edges of the pan. Add about 2 tsp of oil or mist the center of the pan with cooking spray. Add the eggs. Cook until just beginning to set (reduce heat if eggs are cooking very quickly). Start breaking the eggs up with your spatula; you should still have some runny/liquid bits at this point. Add the noodles, 1 cup of the bean sprouts, half the peanuts, half the scallions, and half of the cilantro. Gently fold all the ingredients together until eggs are set.

5. Give the tamarind mixture another quick whisk and add to the pan. Stir until combined and most of the sauce is absorbed (sauce will continue to absorb as pad thai cools). Serve immediately and garnish with remaining bean sprouts, peanuts, scallions, cilantro and lime wedges.

This Thai Cantaloupe-Cucumber Salad with Shrimp (and a tangy Asian dressing) is part of my healthy AND low FODMAP Thai menu! Your main dish is tasty Pad Thai Noodles with chicken and shrimp. Click through to get both recipes!
These Pad Thai noodles with chicken and shrimp are part of my healthy AND low FODMAP Thai menu! Your side dish is Thai Cantaloupe-Cucumber Salad with Shrimp (and a tangy Asian dressing). Click through to get both recipes!

Thai Cantaloupe & Cucumber Salad with Shrimp

I bought a Thai basil plant this year and that's what I used, but regular basil or mint (or a combo) would be just as tasty.

Serves 5 (1 serving = about 1 cup)

INGREDIENTS

1 ½ c chopped English cucumber (192 grams)
1 ½ c matchstick-cut or grated carrots (168 grams)
1 ½ c chopped cantaloupe (250 grams)
1 cup bean sprouts (82 grams)
10 small cooked shrimp, defrosted if necessary and patted dry
3 tbsp lime juice (from 2 limes)
1 tbsp reduced sodium soy sauce
1 tbsp fish sauce
3 tbsp brown sugar
¼ cup (packed) fresh Thai basil, basil, or mint leaves, chopped

INSTRUCTIONS

1. In a large bowl, combine cucumber, carrots, cantaloupe, bean sprouts and shrimp. In a small bowl, whisk together lime juice, soy sauce, fish sauce and brown sugar.

2. Add sauce and chopped herbs to salad mixture and stir gently to combine. Best served right away; may be covered and refrigerated up to 1 day.

Sardine Spaghetti with Tomato-Caper Sauce (Gluten Free, Low-FODMAP, Dairy Free)

Sardine Spaghetti with Tomato-Caper Sauce (Gluten Free, Low-FODMAP, Dairy Free)

This Sardine Spaghetti is a simple pasta dish that's ridiculously healthy and packed with flavor. The quick tomato-caper sauce goes so well with the savory sardines. This dish is gluten free, dairy free and low-FODMAP, but you won't be missing out on anything. Click through for the recipe!

This pasta dish is one of my favorites. I easily make it twice a month. It's definitely a “Go-To Meal” for me, but I haven't stopped and written up the recipe until now.

If you need a simple, seriously healthy meal to break up your holiday feasting, this is it! Sardines are considered a superfood, but I (and probably you, too) wouldn't be eating them if they weren't so tasty.

Sardines are little umami powerhouses—they have that addictive savory-salty-funky flavor that's considered the “fifth taste.”

 Sometimes eating clean or dealing with dietary restrictions means losing out on those special flavor boosters that take a recipe from “really good” to “crazy delicious.” Not the case here!

 If you need more convincing, the sardines make this meal ridiculously healthy. Just the highlights:

  • Bone-building vitamin D, which is hard to come by if you don't eat a lot of dairy or get a lot of sun

  • More iron than the same amount of steak so your immune system stays strong, and you don't get sick so often

  • Omega-3 fatty acids, which sharpen your memory (yup, this recipe will make you smarter)

Lastly, I'm dedicating this recipe to one of my favorite people on the internet as a little holiday gift. She's helped me make this website and all the content that goes with it something I'm truly proud of. I know she appreciates the magical deliciousness of sardines, so this is for you, Regina!

So, have I talked you into whipping up some sardine spaghetti, or are you already a fan of these tasty little fish? If you have a great recipe with sardines, please share in the comments!

This Sardine Spaghetti is a simple pasta dish that's ridiculously healthy and packed with flavor. The quick tomato-caper sauce goes so well with the savory sardines. This dish is gluten free, dairy free and low-FODMAP, but you won't be missing out on anything. Click through for the recipe!

Sardine Spaghetti with Tomato-Caper Sauce (Gluten Free, Dairy Free, Low-FODMAP)

If gluten-free pasta hasn't won your heart (my favorite brands are Jovial and Trader Joe's), this dish is just as good with quinoa. The sauce (you can always double the recipe to have leftovers) is also great over roasted fish, with eggs and toasted bread for breakfast, or added to a rice bowl. I use Ian's panko-style GF breadcrumbs because they stay crispier than the traditional kind. My favorite brand for sardines is Crown Prince (I like the water-packed variety), which I buy at Whole Foods, because the bones and tails are already removed. You can also substitute tuna (the Italian-style packed in olive oil works especially well). If you're low-FODMAP, stick to 1/8 of an avocado per serving.

Author: Julie~Calm Belly Kitchen             Recipe type: Entree
Prep time: 5 mins        Cook time:  30 mins        Total time: 35 mins
Makes 3 low-FODMAP servings or 2 larger servings (can be doubled)

 

INGREDIENTS

2 tbsp extra-virgin olive oil or garlic-infused oil, divided
3 tbsp gluten free breadcrumbs
Salt and freshly ground black pepper
3 oz (about 3 big handfuls) spinach leaves
2 to 3 scallions, sliced (green parts only for low-FODMAP)
¼ tsp red chile flakes (or to taste)
1 (14.5 oz) can petite diced tomatoes (regular diced is good too)
1 tbsp drained capers, roughly chopped
6 oz gluten-free spaghetti
2 (4.37 oz) cans sardines, drained and de-boned if necessary
¼ to ½ avocado, chopped
Lemon wedges for serving


INSTRUCTIONS

1. Heat 2 tsp of the oil in a large skillet on medium. Add breadcrumbs and stir to coat with oil. Cook, stirring occasionally until lightly toasted, about 3 minutes. Season with salt and pepper to taste. Transfer to a small bowl and set aside.

2. In the same skillet, heat 1 tsp of the oil on medium heat. Add spinach and season with black pepper to taste. Cook, stirring frequently until wilted, about 2 minutes. Transfer to another bowl and set aside.

3. Add remaining 1 tbsp oil to the same skillet and heat on medium. Add scallions and chile flakes and cook until scallion is tender, about 1 minute. Add tomatoes with their juice. Raise heat to medium high and bring to a simmer. Cook, stirring occasionally, until sauce thickens slightly, 8 to 10 minutes. Stir in capers and remove from heat.

4. Meanwhile, bring a large pot of water to a boil on high heat. Season with salt and add spaghetti. Cook until al dente according to package directions and drain. Return pasta to the pot you just cooked it in. Add sardines, spinach and tomato sauce (for low-FODMAP, reserve about ¼ cup of the sauce for another use). Place pot over low heat and stir gently to combine. Cook just until heated through, 1 to 2 minutes. Top each serving with breadcrumbs and avocado and serve with lemon wedges.

 

Nutrition Information
Serving size: 1/3 of recipe  Calories:545  Fat:24 g Saturated fat:4 g Carbohydrates:63 g Sugar:4  g Sodium:457 mg Fiber:6 g Protein:21 g

 

Brown Rice Noodle and Veggie Stir Fry with Shrimp (Low-FODMAP, gluten free)

Brown Rice Noodle and Veggie Stir Fry with Shrimp (Low-FODMAP, gluten free, dairy free)

This low-FODMAP, gluten free stir fry is easy and healthy! It's made with brown rice noodles for extra fiber. You can use any veggies and protein you want. It's a quick weeknight meal and tastes great for lunch the next day. Click through for the recipe (and free printable shopping list).

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If giving up traditional wheat pasta still bums you out, this recipe will having you loving life again.

Plus, it's fast, addictive and makes for a great leftover lunch.

This is all because of the star ingredient, Asian rice noodles. They're gluten-free of course, they cook in 3 minutes, and they don't take on a weird, gummy texture the next day-- which means you can easily reheat or eat 'em cold straight from the fridge.

Asian rice noodles are versatile (just try them with extra-virgin olive oil, parmesan and lemon zest), but I absolutely love them in this simple stir fry.

How to make this easy rice noodle stir fry!

Here's how it works: You make a quick, tasty sauce and sauté (or steam, or microwave) some veggies. Meanwhile you boil a big pot of water and cook the noodles.

Then you get your protein ready. In this case, I made sautéed shrimp, but you could use baked salmon or chicken, smoked fish, stir fried pork or tempeh, ground turkey or chicken--pretty much anything.

Finally you add it all back to the pot you cooked the noodles in and toss it up. Done. 

All about Asian rice noodles

For this recipe, I used brown rice vermicelli from Annie Chun. You can use any brand. If you have access to an Asian market, you can get them fairly cheaply, but they might only have the white rice variety, not brown.

I like using brown rice noodles because they have 4 grams of fiber per serving (read more about how I like to build my meals around fiber-rich foods). But go with what works for you! I find the Annie Chun brand at large supermarkets, Whole Foods and Vitacost.com.

Asian rice noodles can't flat-out replace Italian pasta (my favorite gluten-free brand of Italian pasta is Jovial, by the way), but they definitely make some tasty meals. I love making pad thai with the thicker type of rice noodles. Have you ever had a low-FODMAP version? Let me know if you'd like a pad thai recipe, and I can make that happen!

Have you cooked with Asian rice noodles before? What do you like to make? Share in the comments or stop by my Facebook page and post your recipes! 

If you liked this post, enter your info below to get a free 1-week menu of Low-FODMAP, gluten-free suppers delivered straight to your inbox!

This low-FODMAP, gluten free stir fry is easy and healthy! It's made with brown rice noodles for extra fiber. You can use any veggies and protein you want. It's a quick weeknight meal and tastes great for lunch the next day. Click through for the recipe (and free printable shopping list).

Brown Rice Noodle & Veggie Stir Fry with Shrimp (Low-FODMAP, gluten free, dairy free)

You can use any veggies you want (or any protein--precooked chicken, pork or tempeh makes the cooking even faster). Some good options are zucchini, tomatoes, kale, broccoli, water chestnuts, bokchoy and eggplant. I also like sprinkling sesame seeds on as a garnish, but I forgot to do it for the photo shoot! A little hot sauce is nice too, if you like some heat.

Author: Julie-Calm Belly Kitchen             Recipe type: Entree
Prep time: 5 mins        Cook time: 30 mins        Total time: 35 mins
Serves 4 (makes great leftovers!)

INGREDIENTS

5 tbsp reduced sodium soy sauce (gluten free if needed)
3 tbsp light brown sugar or maple syrup
3 tbsp fresh lime juice (1 to 2 limes)
2 tbsp rice vinegar
2 tsp sesame oil
1 tbsp vegetable oil
1 large red bell pepper, sliced into thin 3-inch strips
2 cups matchstick carrots
1 tbsp chopped fresh ginger (1-inch piece)
Cooking spray (or additional vegetable oil)
5 oz spinach leaves
1 1/4 lb medium shrimp, peeled and deveined (frozen, defrosted work well)
1/4 tsp salt, plus additional to taste
Black pepper to taste
8 oz brown rice vermicelli
6 scallions, green parts only, sliced

INSTRUCTIONS

1. In a medium bowl, whisk together the soy sauce, brown sugar or maple syrup, lime juice, rice vinegar and sesame oil. Set aside. Heat the vegetable oil in a large skillet on medium-high heat. Add bell peppers and cook, stirring frequently for about 4 minutes. Add carrots and continue cooking until vegetables are crisp-tender, about 4 minutes more (add a few tablespoons of water to the skillet if vegetables start to stick). Add ginger and about three-quarters of the scallions and cook for 1 minute, stirring frequently. Transfer to a medium bowl.

2. Return skillet to the stove top, mist with cooking spray (or add more vegetable oil) and heat on medium. Add spinach and cook, stirring frequntly, until wilted, 2 to 3 minutes. Add to bowl with carrot mixture.

3. Return the skillet to the stove top one more time and mist with cooking spray (or add more vegetable oil). Heat on medium-high. Add shrimp, 1/4 tsp salt and black pepper to taste. Cook, turning occasionally, until shrimp are firm to the touch and opaque in the thickest part, 4 to 6 minutes.

4. Meanwhile, bring a large pot of water to a boil. Add rice noodles and cook, stirring frequently, until al dente, about 3 minutes. Drain in a fine mesh strainer and rinse with cold water. Return noodles to the pot you cooked them in. Give the soy sauce mixture a quick whisk and add to the noodles. Heat on medium high and bring to a simmer. Reduce heat to medium and add the vegetable mixture. Gently toss until combined and heated through. Stir in the shrimp. Taste and season with additional salt and pepper if needed. Serve right away and garnish with the remaining scallions.

Nutrition Information
Serving size: 1/4 of recipe Calories: 492 Fat: 9g Saturated fat: 2g Carbohydrates: 68g Sugar:  14g Sodium: 1302mg Fiber: 9g Protein: 38g

Shrimp and Grits Recipe (Low-FODMAP, gluten free, dairy free)

Low-FODMAP Shrimp and Grits Recipe

Shrimp and millet grits are low-FODMAP, gluten free and dairy free. Plus, they're so quick and easy for weeknight cooking! Click through for a free printable recipe and shopping list.

This little recipe kicked off my fascination with southern cooking.

I've been making versions of it for years. It is so simple, I never followed any one specific recipe. I probably saw it for the first time in a food magazine. Having never eaten grits once in my life, I was so ready to jump on that train!

What are grits, anyway?

Grits are corn that has been dried and ground. So, cornmeal essentially! If you think this sounds a lot like polenta, you're right.

Italian polenta and southern grits are made from different types of corn, and the texture of the grind often varies too. Polenta is almost always made from yellow corn and grits are traditionally made from white.

But at the end of the day, they're very similar, and you can switch them up anytime. 

Why use millet?

I've always made shrimp and grits with ground cornmeal or polenta. Then one day, I was shopping online for gluten-free baking supplies and I came across these millet grits from Bob's Red Mill. They're made by grinding the hulled, whole grain millet so they have a more porridge-like texture and are faster to cook (This post is in no way sponsored by Bob, I just like his products!).

I'm always excited to find a "new food," and I know millet is great low-FODMAP grain option. It took about two seconds for me to click "Add to cart!"

You can use any kind of polenta, cornmeal or grits you want, but I definitely recommend the millet grits. Here's why:

  • It's quick! The millet required about 10 minutes of cooking, while stone ground cornmeal takes at least 20.

  • No lumps. I had a MUCH easier time getting lump-free grits than when I use cornmeal or polenta. Tip: Sprinkle in about 1 tbsp at a time and whisk into the simmering liquid before adding more.

  • It's belly friendly. I don't have digestive trouble with cornmeal products but I know many of you do. Millet could be a great alternative!

 If you want to try your hand at southern cooking, this recipe is a great start. It comes together so quickly and easily. When I give the total cooking time, that includes any chopping that needs to happen beforehand, by the way.

Even better, this is a healthy dish that's low in calories (not usually associated with southern food, I know). It's one of my weeknight stand-bys when I want something a little different and special.

Do you make shrimp and grits? Or are you a die-hard polenta fan looking to try something new? Share in the comments!

Shrimp and millet grits are low-FODMAP, gluten free and dairy free. Plus, they're so quick and easy for weeknight cooking! Click through for a free printable recipe and shopping list.

Shrimp and Millet Grits (Low-FODMAP, gluten free, dairy free)

You can substitute regular corn grits or polenta for the millet grits. Cook them according to the instructions on the package. I used heirloom cherry tomatoes in this recipe, but you can use any tomato (It also works with canned tomatoes. Just simmer to reduce the liquid a bit.). Halve them if you're using cherry tomatoes and chop if you're using large ones. If you're sensitive to tomatoes, try using a larger variety since the small ones are sweeter and are likely to contain more sugar. Do what works for your body!
Author: Julie~Calm Belly Kitchen             Recipe type: Entree
Prep time: 8 mins        Cook time: 30 mins        Total time: 38 mins
Serves 4 (can easily be halved)

INGREDIENTS

3 1/2 cups water
1 cup millet grits (see note above)
Salt and black pepper to taste
1 tbsp garlic infused oil
1 lb tomatoes, chopped (see note above)
5 scallions (green parts only), sliced
1 1/4 lb medium shrimp, peeled and deveined
1 tsp ancho chile powder

INSTRUCTIONS

1. Bring the water to a boil in a medium saucepan. Slowly add the millet (about 1 tbsp at a time), whisking as you go. Reduce heat to medium and simmer, whisking occasionally until millet thickens. Reduce heat to low, maintaining a slow simmer, and partially cover the pan with it's lid. Grits have a tendency to pop up and splatter, so be careful! Continue cooking until millet is tender, 10 to 15 minutes. If you want a thinner consistency, add more water. Season with salt and pepper to taste. Remove from heat, cover and set aside.

2. Meanwhile, heat the oil in a large skillet on medium heat. Add tomatoes and cook, stirring occasionally, until the skin slackens and they release their juices, 4 to 6 minutes. Add about 3/4 of the scallions and cook until tender, 1 to 2 minutes. Season to taste with salt and pepper. Transfer to a bowl and set aside. Wipe out the skillet with paper towel (carefully!).

3. Mist the skillet with cooking spray (or use more garlic oil) and heat on medium high. Season the shrimp with ancho chile powder, salt and pepper. Cook, stirring occasionally, until shrimp feel firm to the touch and are opaque in the thickest part, 4 to 6 minutes. 

4. Add tomatoes back to the skillet with the shrimp and reduce heat to medium low. Stir to combine and cook just until heated through. Serve shrimp mixture over the grits and garnish with remaining scallions.


Nutrition Information
Serving size: 1/4 of recipe  Calories: 352  Fat: 7g  Saturated fat: 1g  Carbohydrates: 40g  Sugar: 3g Sodium: 344mg  Fiber: 5g  Protein: 36g