Elimination Phase

How To Deal with IBS-D (Try these 4 strategies in this order!)

Learn 4 strategies to help IBS-D (when diarrhea is your main symptom). These tips go in order from adjustments to the low FODMAP diet to exploring new options like the Specific Carbohydrate Diet. You'll also learn the specific type of fiber that's most helpful for IBS-D. Click through to get the strategies!

Looking for FODMAP Recipes? Making Your Favorite Foods Low-FODMAP

Ultimate Guide to Making Your Favorite Recipes Low-FODMAP

I’m laying out every tip, trick, strategy and substitution I know to make crave-able, drool-worthy recipes that happen to be low-FODMAP. Click through to read the epic list of makeover strategies that starts with simple swaps and progresses to mini recipes (Blue Cheese Dressing! Citrus-Herb Marinade! Flavorful Tomato Sauce!) and creative flavor tactics. You can still eat the food you love and control your IBS on the fodmap diet!

You've Gotta Pin This One!

I love a good makeover (any What Not To Wear fans in here?), but even more than the fashion and style stuff, I love a recipe makeover. 

Want proof? Here you go…

recipe-makeover-ravioli.png

Yup, for over 3 years I wrote a monthly column for Clean Eating magazine where I revamped classic recipes to make them healthy and (obviously) clean. I loved this gig. But just because a recipe’s healthy doesn’t mean it’s IBS-friendly.

Lucky for you, making over your favorite foods into FODMAP recipes is NOT as hard as it seems. And you don’t need any ninja-chef skills to do it.

Psst >>> If you want to start the FODMAP Diet but feel overwhelmed, I created a FREE email course to ease you into it and give you the tools you need to succeed.

Click to sign up for the Free 7-Day FODMAP Jumpstart Challenge!

Why Recipe Makeovers?

It’s absolutely essential that you learn to make some of your favorite dishes low-FODMAP. Why? Because one of the biggest reasons people stumble in the first phase of the FODMAP Diet - the Elimination Phase - is the fear and sadness over giving up the food they love.

(I know this from experience - I wasted months before I finally did the Elimination Phase because giving up food was too sad.)

In this post, I’m laying out the best tips, tricks, strategies and substitutions I know to develop crave-able, drool-worthy FODMAP recipes. It's the foundation of the Calm Belly Kitchen Cookbook. And it’s how I got myself through the FODMAP Diet with zero deprivation.

This epic list of makeover strategies starts with simple swaps and progresses to mini recipes and creative flavor tactics.

Before you dive in, watch the video to see some of my personal favorite recipe makeover strategies and substitutions (If you love Italian and Mexican food, it's a must-see.). Then read the post with YOUR favorite recipes in mind.

If you remember one thing, make it this: Eating great food that you love is so do-able on the FODMAP Diet, and you’re not being sentenced to food prison without parole.


1) Replace Onion With Leek Tops: The green part is low-FODMAP, while the white part is high. Leeks have more flavor than onions, and you won’t cry when you cut them. Scallion tops are great too. The picture below show what part of the scallion or leek to use. Watch this video to learn how to wash leeks!

2) Replace Garlic With Garlic-Infused Oil: FODMAPs are water soluble, which means they soak out into liquids, but NOT fats. That’s why garlic oil is low-FODMAP. For the boldest flavor, add it at the end of the cooking process.

3) Build Flavor With Anchovies: At the start of the cooking process (when you’d normally sauté onion or garlic), sauté 1 tbsp anchovy paste or 2 to 3 oil-packed anchovies on medium heat in some olive oil.

4) Use Miso: Do the same thing as above with 1 to 2 tbsp of miso paste (especially good in soups and stews)

>>> This blog post has even more ways to replace onion and garlic and add big flavor to your recipes: The Ultimate Guide to Flavor Without Onion and Garlic

5) Add Bacon: It's the time-honored method for making any recipe irresistible.

6) Replace Mushrooms With Eggplant: The texture is similar, and it’s great sautéed, roasted or grilled.

7) Buy Chile Powders With 1 Ingredient: Some products called “chile powder” are blends that often include onion and garlic, which are high-FODMAP. Instead make sure yours only contains chiles. Ancho chile powder is mild and incredibly flavorful.

8) Substitute lactose-free milk anywhere you’d use regular milk: This is real cow’s milk treated with an enzyme to remove the lactose so it works just like regular milk in recipes.

9) Swap Your Veggies: Replace onion and celery with diced or grated carrot, celery root, leek, and/or red bell pepper (works great in recipes that call for the “holy trinity” of onion/celery/carrot)

10) Replace Ketchup: Many commercial ketchups contains high-fructose corn syrup and occasionally honey (both high-FODMAP)...but you've got options.

  • Here’s an easy recipe to DIY

  • Instead of ketchup, toss your oven fries with lemon zest, chopped parsley and garlic-infused oil - delish!

  • Do as the English do and dip fries in mayo (get fancy and mix in Dijon mustard, hot sauce, parsley, or lemon zest)

11) For Mexican Food

What low-FODMAP really looks like! Polenta Lasagna, Cobb Salad with Blue Cheese Dressing (both from    CBK Cookbook   ) and Huevos Rancheros.

What low-FODMAP really looks like! Polenta Lasagna, Cobb Salad with Blue Cheese Dressing (both from CBK Cookbook) and Huevos Rancheros.

12) Replace Chicken Broth: The store-bought stuff is SO convenient, but have you ever tasted it straight? Not all that flavorful. Instead, use water and add some of these flavor boosting ingredients:

Miso paste
Anchovy paste
Dried herbs and spices
Wine
Lemon juice and soy sauce (a killer combo)
Fish sauce

> But wait! Massels brand is onion/garlic-free. 

Or make homemade broth

13) For Marinades: Omit the onion and/or garlic - it will still do the job! Try this easy favorite of mine:                                           

Citrus-Herb Marinade

3 green scallion tops
Handful parsley leaves and stems (about 1/2 packed cup)
2 tbsp dijon mustard
1 tbsp hot sauce (optional) - here’s my fave low-FODMAP brand
1/2 tsp fish sauce
2 tbsp lemon juice
3 tbsp orange juice
2 tbsp rice or red wine vinegar
2 tbsp olive oil

Put all ingredients through vinegar in food processor and blitz. With processor on, slowly pour oil through feed tube. This marinade is great with just about anything, especially chicken and fish.

14) Make Your Own Spice Blends - Most store-bought blends contain onion and/or garlic powder. You can play with the amounts or add other spices you like. I promise, you can’t mess this up. Here’s a simple blend to start with (great for chicken and pork):            

Mild Mexican Spice Blend

1 tsp ancho chile powder
1 tsp cumin
1⁄2 tsp coriander
1⁄2 tsp dried oregano

For Italian Recipes

15) Make Your Own Tomato Sauce:

  1. Sauté chopped leek tops (the green part) in olive oil

  2. Add dried herbs and/or chile flakes

  3. Add ½ cup red wine and reduce (optional)

  4. Then add 1 can tomato sauce and 1 can diced tomatoes

  5. Simmer until slightly thickened

  6. Turn off heat and add fresh basil and garlic-infused oil to taste

Tip: A low-FODMAP serving of canned tomatoes is 1/2 cup.

16) Replace Pasta With Polenta or Risotto: There are some great gluten-free pastas out there too! My favorites are Jovial and Trader Joe’s brand.

17) For Pizza: Buy or make a low-FODMAP crust and top it with your homemade sauce (or do a white pizza with béchamel sauce - see the third idea below)

Three of my favorite topping ideas:

  • Mozzarella, prosciutto, roasted eggplant, goat cheese

  • Mozzarella, ground turkey, sautéed spinach, feta

  • Mozzarella, parmesan, sliced scallops, topped with arugula when it comes out of the oven (great with béchamel sauce)

18) Replace Cream Sauce With Low-FODMAP Béchamel: Here’s my easy recipe, and you can scale it up:

Low-FODMAP Béchamel Recipe

  1. Heat 1 tbsp butter or oil in a small saucepan on medium-low

  2. Add 1 tbsp gluten-free flour blend (must be free of gums, such as this one) or rice flour and stir until combined, about 1 minute

  3. Add 1 cup lactose-free milk and raise heat to medium high

  4. Whisk constantly, breaking up any flour clumps until milk comes to a simmer and sauce thickens

  5. Remove from heat and season with salt and pepper plus any herbs and spices you want

Use it for:

  • Cream soups like chowder

  • Cream sauces like Alfredo

  • Creamed greens

  • White pizza

  • Any recipe that calls for béchamel

19) Replace Creamy Dressings: It’s crazy-easy to make your own with lactose-free plain yogurt or kefir - the amounts are flexible, you can’t mess this up. Here’s an example:

Blue Cheese Dressing Recipe
Tip: Make it a Ranch dressing by swapping the blue cheese for parmesan and adding fresh chives and/or scallions.

3⁄4 cup lactose-free yogurt
3 tbsp lactose-free milk, plus more as needed
2 tbsp lemon juice
1 tbsp nutritional yeast (optional)
1⁄4 tsp sea salt
Freshly ground black pepper to taste
1⁄3 cup (about 1 1⁄2 oz) crumbled blue cheese
2 scallion tops, finely chopped

Stir together all ingredients. Add extra milk if you want a thinner consistency.

20) Learn the Cheese Trick! 

Plenty of cheeses are low-FODMAP, but not every possible variety has been tested by Monash yet. Here’s how to tell if a cheese is low in lactose:

1) Check the ingredients: If added sugars or high-FOMDAP ingredients like honey or garlic (this is common in cheese products or flavored cheeses, not so much in natural cheese). If it’s got ingredients added, this trick doesn’t apply.

Natural cheese DOES include things like: milk (or pasteurized milk), salt, cultures, enzymes, and possibly preservatives or natural colors.

2) Look at the Nutrition Facts. Go to the “sugars” line (lactose, the FODMAP you want to avoid is a sugar). If it contains 0 grams sugar, the cheese is either lactose-free or so very low in lactose that only an extremely sensitive person would have issues (in the US, if the sugar totals < 0.5 gram, manufacturers can round down to zero)

And that's a wrap! 20 cool, creative, delicious ways to makeover your favorite recipes. You don't have to give up everything yummy to do the FODMAP Diet, so don't let fear of missing out on great food hold you back from a calm belly.

What recipes are you going to makeover? Have questions? Leave a comment and let me help!

This post contains affiliate links.

Low-FODMAP Thumbprint Cookie Recipe

Low-FODMAP Thumbprint Cookie Recipe (gluten free, egg free)

These sweet little cookies are low FODMAP, gluten free, egg free and only call for 5 ingredients! They're ridiculously easy - what more could you want. The star ingredient is almond meal which keeps the cookies soft and tender. They're also low in sugar so you can enjoy a treat and stay healthy! Click through to get the 5 ingredient recipe.

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I love making Christmas cookies, and there's no need to give 'em up just because you're following a special diet. 

But these cookies aren't just low-FODMAP. They're better for you health-wise too. Here are all the reasons why you should add them to your cookie tray:

  • They're incredibly easy - Just 5 ingredients (plus salt!)

  • They're made with nutrient-packed almond meal, not flour

  • They're low in sugar

  • They're low-FODMAP, gluten-free and egg-free

  • They stay soft and tender for a few days (thanks to that almond meal), but they also freeze great

Convinced? Sure you are...on to the recipe!

>>> Psst! New to FODMAP? Click here to get started with the FREE 7-Day FODMAP Jumpstart so you can relieve IBS fast!

Low-FODMAP Almond Thumbprint Cookies (gluten free, egg free)

Adapted from this recipe by King Arthur Flour. 
A low-FODMAP serving of almonds is 12 grams, and the whole recipe uses 96 grams. King Arthur makes a super-fine almond flour, and if you use that the cookies will have a shortbread-like texture. Since I had almond meal on hand - and it's easier to find - that's what I used and it works great.

Makes 12 cookies - Recipe may be doubled
(1 serving=1 cookie)

INGREDIENTS

1 cup (96 grams) almond flour
3 1/2 tbsp  (49 g) unsalted butter, at room temp
3 tbsp (25 g) powdered sugar
1/4 tsp sea salt
1/2 tsp vanilla extract
4 tsp strawberry jam

INSTRUCTIONS

1. Preheat oven to 350°F. Line a baking sheet with parchment paper.

2. Add add all ingredients except jam to the bowl of an electric mixer and mix on medium speed until a cohesive dough forms (or mix by hand).

3. Scoop heaping teaspoons of dough and roll into 1 1/4-inch balls. Arrange on prepared baking sheet about 1 1/2 to 2-inches apart.

4. Use your thumb to make an indentation in the center of each ball of dough. Fill with 1/4 tsp jam (overfilling cookies will cause jam to boil over in the oven).

5. Bake 9 to 12 minutes, or until the edges of the cookies feel just set. Cookies will not brown much.

6. Remove the cookies from the oven and cool them on the pan for 10 minutes. Transfer them to a rack to cool completely before serving. Cookies keep at room temperature for 3 days or in the freezer for 3 weeks; defrost at room temp.

Want more EASY holiday treats? Check these out!

Orange-Pecan Cookies (low-FODMAP, gluten-free)

Fudgy One-Bowl Brownies (low-FODMAP, gluten-free)

 

 

5 Things No One Tells You About FODMAP

5 Things No One Tells You About FODMAP

Don't do the FODMAP diet until you read this! When you're learning to eat for IBS, so many questions come up. It's east to get overwhelmed and lost in the details. Click through to find out what you can stop stressing over so you can start feeling better fast!

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Pssst! Follow me into this dark alley…

Just kidding. I’m not going to whisper wacky conspiracy theories in your ear. But I do need to shed light on a few things about FODMAP - the gray areas that don’t get talked about much.

I’m here to make sure you don’t lose sleep stressing over things that don’t matter AND that you stay focused on the positive. (You’re NOT settling for a flavorless life of deprivation!)

Click below to watch the video or keep reading!

 

#1 It’s okay to guess

If a food hasn’t been tested for FODMAP content, make an educated guess - a quick google will give you an idea of what you’re dealing with. If it’s not related to another high-FODMAP food (say it’s an exotic cousin of peaches for example), or it’s buried far down in a long ingredient list, it’s unlikely to throw you off your game.

#2 It’s okay to mess up

Don’t wait for the perfect time to start the Elimination Phase. If you can’t resist empanadas on your trip to Miami, it’s all good. Get back to FODMAP as soon as you can. The goal is consistent improvement for your belly, not obsessing over every bite.

#3 How you eat is just as important as the individual foods you eat

Big meals, too many processed foods, eating when stressed (or stressing about eating), hormone fluctuations, sleep, exercise, high-fat food, salty food...all of it affects how flat or calm your belly feels on any given day. This is true even for people who DON’T have IBS. Don’t let it drive you crazy. Just know that the slice of onion you accidentally ate for lunch might not be solely to blame for your bloat.

#4 Sometimes when you eat a high-FODMAP meal, nothing happens

You decide to treat yourself to a curry and naan at the Indian restaurant even though you’ll probably feel gassy afterwards. So you nosh your naan and feel totally peachy the next day. What the heck?! Maybe it’s because you weren’t stressed about the meal; maybe you ate smaller portions than you would have in the past. Like I said in #3, your gut is a complicated piece of work. The best way to duplicate these good belly days? Track what you eat, and jot down other health factors (i.e. stress level) too.

#5 It’s not for life

FODMAP  is a temporary “learning diet.” As in learn what foods are better or worse for maintaining that flat-belly feeling. Then go forth and embrace life’s deliciousness (with a few modifications). 

Now that you're FODMAP-savvy, it's time to take AWAY those pesky high-FODMAP foods.

Since the easiest way to do this is to focus on what you CAN eat, I created a handy shopping list, complete with links to some of my most-mouthwatering recipes.  

Click here to get your FREE Shopping List!

FODMAP Diet FAQs Part 3: How long until I'm symptom-free?

FODMAP Diet FAQs Part 3: How long until I'm symptom-free?

In part 3 of the FODMAP Diet Frequently Asked Questions series, I'll answer the common concern, "When will I start feeling better on the FODMAP diet?" If you're in the elimination phase, this can be a real struggle, and the answer might surprise you. I'll also explain the related problem of feeling even worse when you first begin doing the FODMAP elimination diet. Click through to watch the video or read the key points now!

Click here to save on Pinterest!

Welcome to Part 3 of the FODMAP Diet Frequently Asked Questions Series!

Here are the other parts of the FODMAP FAQ series:

Part One: Eating at Restaurants and No-FODMAP vs. Low-FODMAP

Part Two: Easy Workday Lunches

Today in Part Three, I'm answering a two-part question that comes up a lot, especially when you're just getting started with the FODMAP diet:

  • How long does it take until I'm symptom free?

  • I feel worse on the low-FODMAP diet...what is going on?

You can hear my thoughts in the 5.5-minute video, or read the key points below.

FAQ Part 1: How long does it take until I'm symptom free?

Short answer: It takes as long as it takes (to put it bluntly!). But what I hear most often is that it takes 2 to 4 weeks before people see a noticeable improvement.

I often hear that people with IBS-D (diarrhea) get symptom relief faster than those with IBS-C (constipation), so that may be a factor in how long it takes for you.

If you've done the elimination phase for 2 to 4 weeks, with no changes, here are some possible explanations:

  • You're overlooking high-FODMAP foods and/or serving sizes in your diet. I recommend using the Monash app as the easiest, most reliable source for keeping track of this stuff.

  • I often say that one restaurant meal won't ruin everything, but when you're doing the elimination phase you want to minimize FODMAPs in your diet as much as possible. So, if you're "cheating," or going out to eat, or having cake for dinner (It's been quite a few years, but I have definitely done this.) every 3 or 4 days, your body won't have a chance to experience life without FODMAPs. This is important because your goal is to find out if eating low-FODMAP truly improves our symptoms or not.

  • It might take a few weeks to get into the groove. The FODMAP diet is really complicated and for a lot of us, me included, it's going to take some time to change our whole way of eating, cooking and shopping for food. You might need to spend a couple weeks learning what to buy at the supermarket and coming up with those go-to meals (My Free 7-Day FODMAP Challenge is great for that!). So, if the elimination phase takes you 8 weeks instead of 4 because you eased into it, that's more than okay.

If you've done the elimination phase as efficiently as possible for at least 4 weeks and you're not seeing improvements, you might have an issue that's not related to FODMAPs.

FAQ Part 2: I feel worse on the low-FODMAP diet...what is going on?

Some people feel worse in the beginning, and there could be a lot of different reasons for this. All the things mentioned above could be factors.

Another big one is stress. You might be stressed about whether or not you're eating the right foods. It doesn't matter where the stress comes from; it can have a real effect on our digestion.

It could be a small thing like drinking a diet soda everyday. It might not contain FODMAPs, but the carbonation can cause bloating and mess with your gut.

People often ask if fiber is a factor--it might be. The low-FODMAP diet is very healthy, so you might be getting more fiber than your system is used to. Whether you're getting too much or not enough, try to add it in slowly so your body doesn't get overwhelmed.

Whatever you're experiencing, don't hesitate to talk to your doctor or the medical pro advising you. If something doesn't seem right, it's better to figure it out sooner rather than later!

Click the box below to get my free cheat sheet sent straight to your inbox!

 

FODMAP Diet FAQs Part 2: Easy Lunches for Work

FODMAP Diet FAQs Part 2: Easy Lunches for Work

Get the answer the most asked question about the low FODMAP diet: What can I eat for a quick workday lunch? Packing an easy, no fuss lunch when you're doing the fodmap elimination diet can be a challenge. Click through to watch the video and read my simple, easy strategies.

Click here to save on Pinterest! 

Welcome to Part Two of the FODMAP Diet Frequently Asked Questions Series!

Here are the other parts of the FODMAP FAQ series:

Part One: Eating at Restaurants and No-FODMAP vs. Low-FODMAP

Part Three: How Long Until I'm Symptom-Free?

Today in Part Two, I'm answering the question I get asked the MOST from the Calm Belly Kitchen Community:

  • What I can eat for lunch at when I'm at work?

You can hear my thoughts in the 5-minute video, or read the key points below.

FAQ #2: "What can I make for a quick, easy workday lunch?"

Figuring out food on the go is definitely a challenge. I have to admit, I eat the same lunch probably 5 days a week. It works for me because I can keep the ingredients on hand, I don't have to think about it, and it's really delicious.

I get asked about my lunch bowls a lot so here's how I make them:

  • I include either brown rice (my favorite), quinoa, sorghum, canned lentils or a combo of two of those. I always make big batches that last me through the week.

  • Then I add either grilled chicken (again, I cook big batches), or salmon or tuna from a pouch.

  • I always add sauteed spinach and at least one cooked veggie that I make ahead of time: roasted zucchini, yellow squash or eggplant; or matchstick-cut carrots that I could in a skillet with a little water until they soften up.

  • I heat all the above ingredients up in the microwave. Then, other add-ons could be feta, olives, or a couple slices of chopped avocado.

  • Finally, I put lactose-free yogurt on it like a sauce. Maybe that's a little weird, but I love it. A simple vinaigrette or nothing at all would be good too.

You could also make a simpler version of my bowl with rotisserie chicken, salad greens, quinoa and vinaigrette (this would be great cold, straight out of the fridge). Or just chicken, roasted/steamed veggies and rice that you could quickly heat up; add some soy sauce and you've got a nice Asian-style rice bowl.

A hearty soup would reheat easily too, and you could make one big batch at the beginning of the week.

If you just want a simple sandwich, use gluten-free bread (I like it better toasted) and instead of deli meat, use a rotisserie chicken or cook a chicken or whole turkey breast in the crockpot. That will give you enough meat for sandwiches all week plus extra for other meals. Then add your mayo, mustard, lettuce or spinach, slices of roasted eggplant or zucchini, cheese...whatever you like!

Click to grab our Free FODMAP Diet Shopping List!

FODMAP Diet FAQs Part 1: Tips for Eating at Restaurants

FODMAP Diet FAQs Part 1: Tips for Eating at Restaurants

Get the facts about the low FODMAP diet. I'll answer 2 of the most frequently asked questions I get: "How can I eat in restaurants and will one dinner out ruin the elimination phase?" And, "Should I be eating a No-FODMAP or a Low-FODMAP diet?" Click through to read the answers to these key questions or watch the video I made with even more info!

Click here to save on Pinterest!

Trying to find information about the low FODMAP diet is frustrating, and you're not alone. Do a search and the results are pretty sparse. Not only that, but you might find outdated food lists or conflicting info.

To cleanse the confusion, I'm creating a series of 3 blog posts to answer the questions I get asked most often about the FODMAP diet. Each post will include a video, as well as the key points so you can either watch or read...whatever works for you!

In Part One, I'll be answering the following FAQs:

  • How do I eat at restaurants on the low FODMAP diet?

  • Should I be eating no-FODMAP or low-FODMAP during the elimination phase?

I sent these videos to my email crew in the Calm Belly Kitchen newsletter (Click here to join now--it's like getting an extra blog post every Friday!) throughout the month of February. The response I got from the community was great, so it seemed silly to keep the videos hidden away on YouTube.

Here are the other parts of the FODMAP FAQ series:

Part Two: Easy Workday Lunches

Part Three: How Long Until I'm Symptom-Free?

FAQ #1: I get overwhelmed when I'm at a restaurant and end up ordering the worst thing on the menu. Does one bad meal ruin everything?

A: It's so hard not to slip up, especially when you're at a good restaurant. Please don't beat yourself up! It's not easy to completely change the way you eat and cook, even if it is for a short time. The important thing to remember is that you really only need to do strict elimination for a few weeks. When you can clearly see an improvement in your symptoms, you can start testing FODMAP foods.

The goal of the elimination is to prove that reducing FODMAPs actually helps you. It's true that testing foods can take a long time (and it's good to be as methodical as possible to get the most knowledge out of it). But if you go out to eat and slip up, you haven't ruined things. You just get back on track and keep going.

If you are planning to eat out, here are some strategies to make it easier:

  • Scout out menus online. Choose a restaurant that uses a lot of simple, fresh ingredients and features some dishes that seem easy to modify.

  • Don't hesitate to call ahead and ask questions.

  • Steakhouses are great because they'll give you a nice piece of meat and cook it exactly the way you want it. They often have simple side dishes too. The same goes for "seafood grill"-type restaurants. Sushi is another great option.

  • Consider chain restaurants. They often have procedures in place to help people with food sensitivites. Some chains that I've heard great things about are Red Robin, P.F. Chang's, Outback Steakhouse, and Maggiano's Little Italy.

FAQ #2: During the elimination phase, should I be FODMAP-free or low-FODMAP? If I am FODMAP-free, what do I eat?

A: It can be really confusing, but the short answer is that you should be eating low-FODMAP during the elimination phase.

Technically, it's nearly impossible to eat no FODMAPs at all. Many foods that are made up of carbohydrates will contain some FODMAPs. But if those foods are "green light" on the Monash app, the FODMAP content is low enough that they shouldn't cause digestive symptoms.

Plain proteins and fats do not contain any FODMAPs because no carbohydrates are present. So that was a quick little scientific explanation!

As long as you're following the recommended low-FODMAP serving sizes of the green light foods during elimination, you are doing great. 

Got a question that you think I should answer in a future FAQ video? I plan to do more, so leave a comment below.

Slow Cooker Chicken & Wild Rice Soup (& Bonus 1-Week Low-FODMAP Menu!)

Slow Cooker Chicken & Wild Rice Soup (& Bonus 1-Week Low-FODMAP Menu!)

This hearty chicken and wild rice soup is a cinch to make in the slow cooker. Thanks to a healthy secret ingredient, it's extra creamy and satisfying. Click through to get this easy recipe and a free 1-week low-FODMAP menu. The menu shows you how to repurpose and jazz up leftovers so you're NOT spending hours cooking every night (win!).

This slow cooker soup is so rich and creamy that it's more of a chowder than a soup. I've eaten it 3 times this week, and I'm sad to run out! I'm so in love with it that I put together a whole week's worth of low-FODMAP meals around it.

More on that in a second, but if you want to just grab the free 1-week dinner menu right now, click the button!

This soup is packed with moist, shredded chicken, veggies and wild rice. To keep the leeks from getting so soft that they melt away, I saute them in a little garlic oil and add them at the very end so they retain their texture and bright oniony flavor. 

But the thing that really sets this recipe apart is a very simple secret ingredien

To get that thick, creamy texture with zero dairy, I stir two egg yolks into the soup. Not only do they thicken, but they add an extra hit of satisfying protein and healthy fat that makes this a meal in a bowl (but don't let that stop you from having a nice green salad on the side!). They don't taste "eggy" either, just rich and delicious.

This hearty chicken and wild rice soup is a cinch to make in the slow cooker. Thanks to a healthy secret ingredient, it's extra creamy and satisfying. Click through to get this easy recipe and a free 1-week low-FODMAP menu. The menu shows you how to repurpose and jazz up leftovers so you're NOT spending hours cooking every night (win!).

The soup recipe is below, but I also put it into a 1-week menu of low-FODMAP dinners for you to download!

So often, when websites offer free meal plans and menus, they just give you 7 totally different recipes as if you have an hour or two to spend cooking every night of the week (and unlimited money to spend on ingredients). I know you don't have that kind of time because you've told me. 

So this menu features four main dinner recipes  with instructions on how to repurpose the leftovers or ideas for different side dishes to jazz them up on day two.

To get the menu delivered straight to your inbox, just click the yellow button and let me know where to send it! 

You'll also be added to the Calm Belly Email Crew, which means every Friday you'll get even more tips, inspiration and bonuses that you won't find on the blog.

So what do you think of this recipe? Have you ever used egg yolks as a thickener before? I'm absolutely loving my slow cooker right now, so if you have a favorite recipe to share, leave a link in the comments!

If you liked this post, would you take a second to share it on Pinterest or Facebook? Thank you...I'm giving you a big computer hug right now!

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Slow Cooker Chicken and Wild Rice Soup

Low-FODMAP, Gluten Free (if made with low-FODMAP, GF broth)

Although I say adding egg yolks is optional, it's a great technique that makes this soup extra special. Stirring them in at the end creates a rich, creamy texture without tasting “eggy.” Since veggies tend to get a little too soft in the slow cooker, I like adding the sautéed leeks at the very end so they retain their bite and pack more onion-like flavor. However, if you want to add them at the beginning, sautéed or not, the soup will still be fantastic. Herbes de Provence is a blend of dried herbs, usually thyme, rosemary, marjoram and lavender; find it in the spice section. Dried thyme may be substituted.

Author: Julie-Calm Belly Kitchen             Recipe type: Main dish
Prep time: 10 mins    Cook time: 4 to 8 hours, 30 mins    Total time: 4 to 8 hours, 40 mins
Serves 4 to 5 

INGREDIENTS
 
4 carrots, peeled and chopped
1 large zucchini, chopped
1 lb boneless, skinless chicken breasts, cut in half if large
1 tbsp butter
1/2 teaspoon dried herbes de Provence or dried thyme
1 bay leaf
4 cups chicken broth
1 cup water
3/4 cup wild rice-brown rice blend (I use Lundberg)
2 egg yolks (optional)
2 tsp garlic-infused or regular olive oil
1 small leek, green parts only, sliced
3 tbsp lemon juice (from 1 lemon)
Salt and black pepper to taste
Grated parmesan cheese for serving
Chopped fresh Italian parsley for serving

INSTRUCTIONS

1. Add all ingredients through rice to a large slow cooker and cook until chicken breasts are opaque in the thickest part (165F on an instant-read thermometer) and rice is tender, 4 hours on high, or 8 hours on low.  Transfer chicken breasts to a cutting board.

2. In a small bowl, whisk the egg yolks. Slowly pour about ¼ cup of the hot soup into the yolks as you whisk (this heats up the yolks so they don't start to scramble when you add them to the hot soup). With the slow cooker on high, slowly pour the yolk mixture into the soup, stirring as you pour. Cover the slow cooker and cook on high for 10 minutes.

3. Heat the garlic oil in a skillet on medium heat. Add leek, season with salt and pepper, and cook until tender, 6 to 8 minutes. Shred the chicken and add it back to the slow cooker along with the leeks. Cover and cook for a few minutes, just until chicken is heated through. If soup is very thick, add water or broth (I added about ½ cup) to thin as you like. Turn off slow cooker and stir in the lemon juice. Season to taste with salt and black pepper. Ladle into bowls and top with Parmesan and fresh parsley.